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Harverson DE-316 - History

Harverson DE-316 - History


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Harverson

Harold Aloysius Harverson, born 7 August 1913 at Lake Charles, La., graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy 3 June 1937. After serving in Louisville and on the staff of the Pacific Fleet Scouting Force, Lt. (j.g.) Harverson was assigned to Utah 19 August 1941. Operating out of Pearl Harbor, the aged ax-battleship, converted to a target ship, served the fleet as the major antiaircraft training ship, as well a,s a key to developing carrier air-to-ship attack tactics. During the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941, the Japanese concentrated much of their strike force on Utah in the assumption that she was carrier Saratoga. Torpedoed twice early in the attack, she had overturned and sunk by 0812. Like so many of her crew, Lt. Harverson gave his life in the opening moments of World War II.

(DE-316: dp. 1,200, 1. 30G'; b. 36'7" di. 8'7", s. 21 k.; cgl. 186; a. 3 3", 2 40mm., 8 20mm. 3 21" tt., 2 dct.,8 dcp., 1 dcp. (h.h.); cl. Edsall)

Harverson (DE-316) was laid down by Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Tex., 9 March 1943- launched 22 May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. T. L. Herlong, mother; and commissioned at Orange 12 October 1943, Lt. Comdr. P. Stinson, USCG, in command.

Manned entirely by a Coast Guard crew, Harverson completed shakedown out of Bermuda only to be seriously damaged in collision with a merchantman 15 December 1943, on a foggy night off the Virginia Capes. Repairs were completed at Portsmouth, VA., by February 1944, and the destroyer-escort joined Escort Division 22. Departing New York 1 March, Harverson escorted a convoy to Londonderry, Ireland, via Halifax. In the next 14 months she escorted nine more convoys carrying vitally needed supplies for the European theatre safely across the dangerous North Atlantic.

When V-E Day came, CortDiv 22 was ordered to the Pacific; and Harverson reached Pearl Harbor via the Panama Canal and San Diego 11 July to begin refresher training. Harverson was still engaged in tactical training at Pearl Harbor when Japan capitulated, but soon she participated in the occupation of the defeated enemy's homeland. Departing Harbor 3 September, she escorted a convoy LSTs to Japan, where she arrived Sasebo 24 September. During the next few weeks she operated along the coast of Honshu, escorting Mt. McKinley (AGC-7) and supporting occupation landings at Wakayama, Hiro, and Nagoya. She departed Yokohama for the United States 4 November and arrived Jacksonville, Fla., in December for duty with the Atlantic Fleet. She decommissioned at Green Cove Springs, Fla., 9 May 1947, and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

Harverson was towed to the Mare Island Navy Yard in 1950 for conversion to a radar picket ship. She recommissioned at Vallejo, Calif., 12 February 1951, Lt. W. S. Slocum III in command; and, as the first of a new class of radar picket ships, she was redesignated DER-316. After intensive tests and vigorous tactical training, Harverson joined Escort Squadron 10 at Newport, R.I., 30 May to begin duty as a radar picket ship. While on patrol, the former destroyer escort outfitted with the most modern radar and early detection warning devices, cruised off the coast of the United States to provide adequate early warning of. any enemy attack. From her usual station in the North Atlantic, Harverson also sailed to the Caribbean for frequent antisubmarine and tactical exercises.

Departing Newport 15 July 1957, Harverson reported for radar picket duty at Pearl Harbor 18 August. There she joined the Barrier Forces, Pacific Fleet, to strengthen America's warning system in the vast and lonely reaches of the Pacific. After almost 3 years of barrier patrols out of Hawaii, Harverson steamed to San Francisco for inactivation She decommissioned 30 June 1960 and joined the Pacific Reserve Fleet, Stockton, Calif. Her name was struck from the Navy List 1 December 1966. She is scheduled to be used as a target.


Heritage & History

In 1911, Quincy Adams Harveson opened one of the first mortuaries in Fort Worth at 105 South Jennings, a well-constructed, three-room building on a newly-paved street just two blocks south of downtown Fort Worth. He hired Samuel D. Sloan, an embalmer, and obtained a wagon and a good horse. In early January, they provided their first burial service and so began a 100-year-old history of the Thompson Harveson and Cole Funeral Home and Crematory.

One of Mr. Harveson’s daughters married Grover Cleveland Cole, and these two men, named after presidents, joined together to operate the undertaking company called Harveson and Cole.

In 1927, Harveson and Cole moved to the Southside Masonic Lodge building, a prestigious 5-story structure on the corner of Magnolia and Fifth. Harveson and Cole occupied the basement and first floor of the building for the next thirty years.

Their relationships with the Masons and railroad brotherhoods solidified the funeral home’s success through the 1930s and 1940s.

On June 16, 1948, Guy Thompson joined Harveson and Cole and by 1957 was named vice president and general manager. “Mr. Cole Sr. was ill, our outmoded building and the Magnolia neighborhood were deteriorating, and a truly faithful clientele, who have always remained so, were wondering, ‘What about the new management? Are their facilities going to be adequate for the future?’ ” wrote Guy Thompson in his business chronicles.

With the help of banking friends, building contractors and loyal supporters, the company was moved to 702 Eighth Avenue in 1957. The site already had a rich history. The home was built in 1888 for Fort Worth’s first banking families, the McFarlands and the Connells. In 1957, it was purchased by the Thompson family and devoted to its present use. Every effort has been made to preserve its architectural integrity and beauty, from the gracious entryway to the carriage house.


The "Register of Commissioned and Warrant Officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps" was published annually from 1815 through at least the 1970s it provided rank, command or station, and occasionally billet until the beginning of World War II when command/station was no longer included. Scanned copies were reviewed and data entered from the mid-1840s through 1922, when more-frequent Navy Directories were available.

The Navy Directory was a publication that provided information on the command, billet, and rank of every active and retired naval officer. Single editions have been found online from January 1915 and March 1918, and then from three to six editions per year from 1923 through 1940 the final edition is from April 1941.

The entries in both series of documents are sometimes cryptic and confusing. They are often inconsistent, even within an edition, with the name of commands this is especially true for aviation squadrons in the 1920s and early 1930s.

Alumni listed at the same command may or may not have had significant interactions they could have shared a stateroom or workspace, stood many hours of watch together… or, especially at the larger commands, they might not have known each other at all. The information provides the opportunity to draw connections that are otherwise invisible, though, and gives a fuller view of the professional experiences of these alumni in Memorial Hall.


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For a list of the files that are provided in this update, download the file information for cumulative update 4487044.


USS HARVESON DE-316 Framed Navy Ship Display

This is a beautiful ship display commemorating the USS HARVESON (DE-316). The artwork depicts the USS HARVESON in all her glory. More than just an artistic concept of the ship, this display includes a custom designed ship crest plaque and an engraved ship statistics plaque. This product is richly finished with custom cut and sized double mats and framed with a high quality black frame. Only the best materials are used to complete our ship displays. Navy Emporium Ship Displays make a generous and personal gift for any Navy sailor.

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DR. LOUIS A HARVESON

Dr. Louis A. Harveson is the founder and director of the Borderlands Research Institute and holds the Dan Allen Hughes, Jr., Endowed Directorship. Since 1998, Dr. Harveson has served as a faculty member at Sul Ross State University in Alpine, Texas where his research program has focused on the ecology and management of large mammals, upland gamebirds, and predators. Harveson’s research efforts have focused on the borderlands of Texas-Mexico including Gulf Coast Prairies, South Texas Brush Country, and the Trans-Pecos Mountains and Basins. An underlying theme to Harveson’s research has been on conservation of natural resources on private lands.

Harveson received a B.S. in Wildlife Management from Texas Tech University, his M.S. in Range and Wildlife Management from Texas A&M University-Kingsville where he worked with northern bobwhites, and received his Ph.D. in Wildlife Science from the Joint Ph. D. program at Texas A&M University-Kingsville and Texas A&M University where he studied mountain lions in south Texas.

Harveson serves on numerous regional and statewide conservation committees and presently serves as Second Vice-President of Programs for Texas Wildlife Association. Harveson is a Certified Wildlife Biologist and an active member of The Wildlife Society at the national, state, and university level.

Research Specialties

Big Game Ecology
Upland Gamebird Ecology
Habitat Management

Courses Taught

NRM 4408 Big Game Management
NRM 5305 Range and Wildlife Research Methods

Selected Publications

Culver, M., C. Varas, P. M. Harveson, B. R. McKinney, and L. A. Harveson. Connecting wildlife habitats across the U.S.-Mexico border. Pages 83-99 in Lopez-Hoffman, L., E. D. McGovern, R. G. Varaday, and L. W. Flessa, editors. Conservation of shared environments: Learning from the United States and Mexico. University of Arizona Press.

Harveson, L. A. 2007. Quails of the Trans-Pecos. Pages 202-216 in L. A. Brennan, editor. Texas quails: ecology and management. Texas A&M University Press, College Station, Texas.

Harveson, L. A., T. H. Allen, F. Hernandez, D. A. Holdermann, J. M. Mueller, and M. S. Whitley. 2007. Montezuma quail ecology and life history. Pages 23-39 in L. A. Brennan, editor. Texas quails: ecology and management. Texas A&M University Press, College Station, Texas.


Pearl Harbor Heroes

The following ships were named in honor of Pearl Harbor Heroes.

Ship NameDesignation and Hull Number
AUSTIN DE 15
BARBER DE 161
BATES DE 68
BENNIONDD 662
BEVERLY W. REID DE 722
BOOTH DE 170
BOWERS DE 637
BRACKETT DE 41
BUCKLEY DE 51
CALLAGHAN DD 792
CALLAGHAN DD 994
CASSIN YOUNG DD 793
CHARLES LAWRENCE DE 53
CHRISTOPHER DE 100
CHUNG-HOON DDG 93
CLAUDE V RICKETTS DDG 5
CLOUES DE 265
CONNOLLY DE 306
CROWLEY DE 303
CURTS FFG 38
DANIEL T GRIFFIN DE 54
DARBY DE 218
DAVIS DD 937
DAY DE 225
DENNIS DE 405
EDWARD C DALY DE 17
EMERY DE 28
ENGLAND DE 635
ENGLAND DLG 22
ENGLISH DD 696
FINNEGAN DE 307
FLAHERTY DE 135
FOGG DE 57
FORMOE DE 509
FOSS DE 59
FREDERICK C DAVIS DE 136
GANTNER DE 60
GEORGE W INGRAM DE 62
GOSSELIN DE 710
HALLORAN DE 305
HARMON DE 678
HARVESON DE 316
HAVERFIELD DE 393
HAYTER DE 212
HERBERT C JONES DE 137
HILL DE 141
HOLLIS DE 794
HOWARD D CROW DE 252
HUBBARD DE 211
HUGH W. HADLEY DD 774
IRA JEFFERY DE 63
J RICHARD WARD DE 243
JAMES E CRAIG DE 201
JOHN FINN DDG 113
JOHN L WILLIAMSON DE 370
JORDAN DE 204
KEPPLER DD 765
KIDD DD 661
KIDD DDG 993 ex DD 993
KIDD DDG 100
KIRKPATRICK DE 318
LAKE DE 301
LAMONS DE 743
LEE FOX DE 65
LeHARDY DE 20
LEOPOLD DE 319
LOWE DE 325
LOY DE 160
MANLOVE DE 36
MANNING DE 199
MARSH DE 699
McCANDLESS FFT 1084 ex FF 1084 ex DE 1084
McCLELLAND DE 750
MENGES DE 320
MERRILL DE 392
MILLER DE 1091
MOORE DE 240
MOSLEY DE 321
NEUENDORF DE 200
NEWMAN DE 205
O'NEILL DE 188
OTTERSTETTER DE 244
PETERSON DE 152
PHARRIS DE 1094
PRIDE DE 323
RALL DE 304
REEVES DE 156
REGISTER DE 233
RICHEY DE 385
ROSS DDG 71
SANDERS DE 40
SAVAGE DE 386
SCHMITT DE 676
SCOTT DE 214
SEDERSTROM DE 31
SMARTT DE 257
SOLAR DE 221
SPANGENBERG DE 223
STERN DE 187
STOCKDALE DE 399
SWENNING DE 394
THOMAS J GARY DE 326
TOMICH DE 242
UHLMANN DD 687
VAN VALKENBURGH DD 656
WALTER B. COBB DE 596
WALTER S BROWN DE 258
WEAVER DE 741
WEEDEN DE 797
WILLIAM C MILLER DE 259
WILLIAM M. HOBBY DE 236
WILLIAM T. POWELL DE 213
WILLIS DE 395
WYMAN DE 38

If a ship is missing from this list or if no page is associated with a ship (ie, the ship's name is not an active link), then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and fix it. See Editing the Alphabetical List of Ships for detailed information on editing this page.


WEB OF EVIL (& ENNUI)

WED 15 DEC 1943
Pacific
Naval Operating Base, Treasury Island, Solomons, is established.

TF 76 (Rear Admiral Daniel E. Barbey) lands Army troops (112th U.S. Cavalry Regiment) on Arawe Peninsula, New Britain, in Operation DIRECTOR.

Destroyer escort Harveson (DE-316) is damaged in collision with U.S. merchantman William T. Barry, 36䓯'N, 74䓡'W.

USAAF aircraft sink Japanese cargo ship Senko Maru in Gulf of Tonkin, 21䓅'N, 108䓞'E.

RAAF Beaufighters sink Japanese army cargo ship Wakatsu Maru Dutch B-25s sink cargo ship Genmei Maru off Timor.

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WEB OF EVIL (& ENNUI)

THU 25 NOV 1943
Pacific
Battle of Cape St. George is fought during the early hours as the five ships of Destroyer Squadron 23 (Captain Arleigh A. Burke) intercept five Japanese destroyers (Captain Kagawa Kiyoto) off Cape St. George, New Ireland. Charles Ausburne (DD-570), Claxton (DD-571), and Dyson (DD-572) sink Onami with torpedoes and Yugiri with gunfire the same three U.S. ships, joined by Spence (DD-512) and Converse (DD-509), sink Makinami with torpedoes and gunfire and damage Uzuki. DESRON 23 suffers no damage.

Destroyer Radford (DD-446) sinks Japanese submarine I-19 north of Gilberts, 03䓊'N, 171䓷'E.

Submarine Albacore (SS-218) sinks Japanese army cargo ship Kenzan Maru, 00䓮'N, 144䓲'E.

Submarine Searaven (SS-196) sinks Japanese fleet tanker Toa Maru north of Ponape, 08䓖'N, 158䓀'W.

USAAF B-24s bomb Japanese installations at Taroa, damaging guardboat Takeura Maru.

Japanese submarine RO 100 is sunk by mine two miles west of Omai Island, outside north channel to Buin.

Atlantic
Advanced Amphibious Base, Salcombe, Devonshire, England, is established.

PB4Y (VB 107) sinks the Indian Ocean-bound German submarine U-849, South Atlantic, 06䓞'S, 05䓨'W.


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