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The Mysterious Fate of the Romanov Family's Prized Easter Egg Collection

The Mysterious Fate of the Romanov Family's Prized Easter Egg Collection



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In 2010, an American scrap-metal dealer visited an antiques stall somewhere in the United States and purchased a golden egg sitting on a three-legged stand. The egg was adorned with diamonds and sapphires, and it opened to reveal a clock. Intending to sell the object to a buyer who would melt it down for its component metals, the dealer purchased this egg-clock for $13,302. He then had trouble selling it, as potential buyers deemed it overpriced.

The dealer had valued it incorrectly—but not the way he originally thought. In 2014, the man—who remains anonymous—discovered that his little golden objet d’art was one of the 50 exquisitely bespoke Fabergé Easter eggs created for imperial Russia’s royal Romanov family. Its value? An estimated $33 million.

The Romanovs’ extravagant royal Easter egg tradition began with Czar Alexander III in 1885. Alexander was then in the fifth year of his reign, having succeeded his father, Alexander II, who had been killed by bomb-wielding assassins. In 1885, Alexander sought an Easter gift to surprise and delight his wife Maria Feodorovna, who had spent her early years as a Danish princess before leaving Copenhagen to marry him and become a Russian empress. He turned to Peter Carl Fabergé, a master goldsmith who had taken over his father’s House of Fabergé jewelry business in 1882.

Gifts that were ‘immensely personal, yet gloriously flamboyant’

Instead of crafting a dazzling necklace or a breathtaking ring, Fabergé created something deceptively plain: a white enameled egg around two-and-a-half inches tall. But the real treasures were to be found inside. The egg twisted apart to reveal a golden yolk within. Inside the yolk was a golden hen sitting on golden straw. Hidden in the hen was a tiny diamond crown that held an even tinier ruby pendant.

This astonishing creation, known as the Hen Egg, was the first of an eventual 50 Fabergé imperial eggs commissioned annually by the Romanov family’s two final czars: Alexander III and, from 1894, Nicholas II. Fabergé crafted the initial eggs according to Alexander’s specifications. After the first few years, says Fabergé expert Dr. Géza von Habsburg, “he was basically given carte blanche to use his creativity and the craftsmanship of his workshops to produce really the very best that could be imagined as an Easter present.”

These one-of-a-kind creations, given to the czars’ wives, Maria and Alexandra Feodorovna, were “immensely personal, yet gloriously flamboyant,” wrote Toby Faber in Fabergé’s Eggs. No two were even slightly similar, and each contained a surprise meaningful to the recipient.

In 1897, Nicholas II gave his wife Alexandra the Imperial Coronation Egg. The shell is made of gold embellished with translucent yellow enamel and overlaid with black enamel double-headed eagles. Inside the white velvet-lined egg is an exquisitely detailed miniature 18th-century golden carriage. The object, which took more than a year to create, is a replica of a coach once owned by Catherine the Great and used in Nicholas and Alexandra’s own 1896 coronation procession.

The 1901 Gatchina Palace egg, which Nicholas II gave to his mother Maria Feodorovna, has a pearl-encrusted shell of gold, enamel, silver-gilt, portrait diamonds and rock crystal. It opens to reveal a faithful rendering of the palace Maria called home.

How the eggs fared after the Revolution

All was shiny and beautiful in the imperial palaces, but by the early 20th century, Nicholas II was contending with international conflicts, nationwide impoverishment, a population boom and a growing number of former serfs eager to overthrow a czar they saw as oppressive and out of touch. In 1904 and 1905, when Russia was at war with Japan, Nicholas suspended his annual Fabergé egg commission.

He resumed the tradition in 1906, though, and had one delivered every Easter until 1917. That year, Fabergé worked on two eggs, but before they could be presented, the Bolshevik’s February Revolution arrived and Nicholas II was forced to abdicate the throne. His entire family was executed by Bolsheviks the following year.

READ MORE: Why Czar Nicholas II and the Romanovs Were Murdered

So what became of the imperial eggs? Under the orders of new leader Vladimir Lenin, the Bolsheviks packed up the eggs and other royal valuables they found at the imperial palaces and stashed them safely at the Kremlin in Moscow. In the 1920s and ‘30s, the Russian economy tanked and famine affected millions. The country's new leaders, looking to make some quick rubles, started selling the imperial eggs to international buyers.

Today, there are 10 eggs at the Kremlin Armory, nine at the Fabergé Museum in St. Petersburg, five at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and three each at the Royal Collection in London and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Two more are on display in Lausanne, Switzerland, two at Hillwood Estate in Washington, D.C., and two at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. There’s a single egg in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art, one in Monte Carlo, and one at the Fabergé Museum in Baden-Baden, Germany. One is also owned by Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, the former Emir of Qatar.

The fate of several eggs remains unknown.

The fate of eight imperial eggs remain a mystery. Fabergé experts "know of two further eggs which are in the West," says von Habsburg, "or which at a certain moment were in the West.”

They include the 1889 Necessaire Egg, last spotted in London in 1949, and the 1888 Cherub With Chariot Egg, which seems to have been exhibited at Lord & Taylor department store in New York in 1934. Von Habsburg says certain clues about the eggs’ whereabouts are currently being pursued.

The mystery surrounding the lost eggs perpetuates their legendary history of being seen only by an elite few. These things were never shown to the Russian public, with one exception, says von Habsburg—a 1902 exhibition in St. Petersburg. “Nobody knew about them—they were kept in the two or three imperial palaces that the family inhabited.”

The excess of the eggs, and their seclusion from the public, reflect the elitist, out-of-touch final years of Czarist Russia. “They may be masterpieces,” wrote Faber, “but they also embody extravagance that even the Romanovs’ most ardent supporter would find hard to justify.”

READ MORE: Why the Romanov Family’s Fate Was a Secret Until the Fall of the Soviet Union


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Britain has long been fascinated with Russia’s dynastic dramas – perhaps because the two countries share royal history and blood. Alexandra was in part raised by her grandmother, Queen Victoria, while Nicholas was a first cousin of King George V, which accounted for their famously uncanny resemblance. Although the British government initially offered political asylum to Nicholas and his family in 1917, the plan was quashed due to fears that this could lead to popular unrest, threatening other European monarchies. As such, the family’s bloody fate was sealed.

A new exhibition at the Science Museum in London, “The Last Tsar: Blood and Revolution”, does not fantasise about potential Romanov survivors, nor does it dwell on the politics around their deaths. Instead, the show takes a more grounded (and, unsurprisingly, scientific) approach to the Romanovs and their legacy. The first half details the family’s relationship with both conventional and mystical forms of medicine which they used to address a range of ailments – including the tsarina’s anxiety and her son Alexei’s haemophilia. The second half outlines how, more than 70 years afterwards, forensics helped explain how the family died. Scattered throughout the exhibition are the objects from the family’s private lives – jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs among them.

The exhibition sometimes lacks organisation or depth. Digressions on topics such as female mental illness are interesting but distracting. And although some objects on display truly belonged to the family (like their travelling medical chest), the show heavily relies on generic historical medical devices borrowed from the Wellcome Collection. But these are minor quibbles. The Science Museum has created an engaging, accessible exhibition that offers a novel perspective on one of history’s most infamous events.

Tsar Nicholas II and his children (1915)

This photograph was taken from one of the 22 photo albums compiled by Herbert Galloway Stewart, a British tutor employed by the tsar’s sister, the grand duchess Xenia. Between 1908 and 1918, Stewart photographed the extended Romanov family at home in St Petersburg and on their Crimean holidays. These albums were only recently rediscovered in the Science Museum’s archives.

In contrast with official photographs, which depict the Romanovs as stiff and inaccessible in their luxurious finery, these casual snaps give viewers an insight into their relaxed family life. Both summer and winter shots show the Romanovs enjoying various natural pastimes it is evident from their cosy body language and easy smiles that they prefer life away from the strictures of court.

The tsar’s five children – Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia and Alexei (pictured second from right) – were born into great wealth and privilege, but their parents tried to raise them as humbly as possible. The children slept on hard mattresses in iron frames, took cold baths, and had limited spending money. Yet compared to many other royal children, the Romanov brood had a happy childhood. Everyone doted on Alexei, and the girls were especially close, signing letters with their joint initials OTMA. Although Nicholas (pictured second from left) is still considered one of the most inept tsars in Russian history, photographs depicting him as a loving, proactive parent have spurred some historians to repaint him as a gentle, introspective man who was ill-equipped for the demands of his position.

Image: Science Museum Group Collection

Tsarina Alexandra Fyodorovna’s maternity dress (1903-1904)

History has been kinder to the tsar than to his wife. Along with Queen Victoria, Alexandra was one of the most famous royal carriers of haemophilia B, a rare genetic disorder that passes down the matrilineal line but manifests almost exclusively in males. Haemophilia stops its sufferers’ blood from clotting, making them vulnerable to excessive blood loss, easy bruising and internal bleeding. Alexandra’s childhood in Germany was marred by her older brother’s death from the disease, as well as by her mother’s from diphtheria. Although her marriage to Nicholas was a love match, the mutual political suspicion between Germany and Russia meant that Alexandra was an unpopular figure once she moved to Russia in 1894.

Alexandra had proven her fertility by giving birth to four healthy daughters, but the imperial establishment was not satisfied. The pressure to provide a male heir caused Alexandra to develop numerous health issues, such as sciatica, anxiety and even a phantom pregnancy in 1902. Around this time, she began to call on mystics in the hope that their unconventional treatments would help her to conceive a son.

This lace-and-mauve silk maternity dress was made for Alexandra during her pregnancy with Alexei, the long-awaited tsarevich, who was born in 1904. It soon became clear that he was a haemophiliac. Guilt-stricken Alexandra withdrew from court, hoping to keep his condition a secret. She devoted her life to his protection but at the expense of her own popularity. Her aloofness did not endear her to the Russian people, and her firm belief in the tsar’s divine right to rule and her blind reliance on Rasputin (whom she recruited to treat Alexei) further damaged her reputation – and the public perception of the entire Romanov family.

Image: the State Hermitage Museum

Imperial Red Cross Fabergé easter egg (1915)

Between 1885 and 1917, Peter Carl Fabergé and his studio designed 50 opulent Easter eggs for tsars Alexander III and his son Nicholas II, who would give one as a present each year to their mothers and wives. Forty-three eggs still survive, including this one, presented by Nicholas to Alexandra in 1915. On each side of the opalescent, enamelled egg is a translucent red cross, inlaid with portraits of Olga and Tatiana in nurses’ uniforms. The image of Tatiana secures the egg’s double doors, which open to reveal a triptych of the resurrection and the grand duchesses’ patron saints.

This egg – along with its companion, the Red Cross with Imperial Portraits, given to Nicholas’s mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Fyodorovna, in 1915 – commemorated the work that Alexandra and her daughters did for the Red Cross during the first world war. By caring for wounded soldiers in a private hospital, Olga and Tatiana were finally able to take on public roles and responsibilities – as well as glimpse first-hand the disastrous effects of the war on Russia’s population.

Image: the Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio

Steel Fabergé easter egg with “surprise” miniature on an easel (1916)

This was the last Fabergé egg presented to the imperial family, given by Nicholas to Alexandra in 1916, a year before his abdication. Compared to the decadent designs of other Fabergé eggs, this creation is surprisingly muted. The steel exterior is unusually free of gemstones and is supported by four artillery shells, whereas the silk and velvet interior envelopes the “surprise” element – a miniature painting in a diamond-lined frame depicting Nicholas and Alexei strategising with Russian officers. The egg was clearly designed to portray the Russian military as a powerful and well-organised force.

The reality of the Russian war effort could not have been more different. Although Russia entered the war with the largest army in the world, it was badly prepared for a global conflict, lacking an industrialised supply base, efficient train networks and competent leaders. The war did not lead to an increase in patriotic, pro-imperial sentiment, as Nicholas perhaps had hoped. In fact, dwindling resources, heavy losses at the front, and Alexandra’s unpopularity made Russians increasingly dissatisfied with the imperial government. This anger manifested in riots and rebellions on the homefront, setting the stage for the February and October revolutions of 1917.

Image: the Moscow Kremlin State Museums

Diamond and emerald cross belonging to the Empress Alexandra Fyodorovna (before 1918)

Nicholas II abdicated during the February revolution. After the British government withdrew its offer of political asylum in April 1917, the Romanovs were moved by the moderate provisional government, led by Alexander Kerensky, to the city of Tobolsk in the Urals. The family intended to stay there until their foreign exile was arranged, but the triumph of the Bolsheviks during the October revolution spelled their doom. In spring 1918, Nicholas and his family were moved to their final location at Ipatiev House in Yekaterinburg, where they were killed in the early hours of July 17th 1918.

Alexandra’s diamond and emerald cross was found in the room in which the family was killed. It was a gift from her mother-in-law, the Dowager Empress, and was one of the few personal belongings that Alexandra brought into exile. Along with the other items collected from the scene (including a damaged “Mother of God” icon, also on display), the jewelled cross was used as evidence in an official inquiry conducted by Nikolai Sokolov, a case investigator associated with the anti-Bolshevik White Army. Until the opening of Soviet archives during the 1990s, Sokolov’s report from 1920 provided the only reliable proof that the tsar and his family had been killed. But because Sokolov was unable to locate the Romanovs’ remains, rumours soon spread that one or more members of the imperial family had managed to escape the massacre.

Image: Russian History Foundation, Jordanville, NY

Facial reconstruction of skull number 19 from the Ekaterinburg remains, believed to belong to Nicholas II (1995)

Nicholas II’s remains were uncovered in 1979 and exhumed in 1991 alongside those of four other suspected Romanovs. The forensic quest to conclusively identify the remains during the 1990s drew international attention. Peter Gill, a British scientist, used DNA profiling (a relatively new science at the time) to prove that they were from the same family group. Scientists then tested the mitochondrial DNA, which passes unchangingly down the matrilineal line, and compared the results against known Romanov descendents. The mitochondrial DNA from several living European royals – including the current British consort Prince Philip, who is related to the tsarina through his mother – perfectly matched the samples taken from Alexandra and her children. The bodies found were indeed those of the last Romanovs.

Two additional sets of remains, uncovered in 2007, were later identified as belonging to Alexei and Maria. But even in death, the Romanovs have not found a peaceful end. The family were canonised in 2000, pleasing Russia’s increasingly pro-church political establishment but angering those who saw the imperial system as autocratic. And although most of the family was interred with great pomp in St Peter and Paul Cathedral in St Petersburg in 1998, Alexei and Maria remain unburied at the insistence of the Russian Orthodox Church, who have kept the remains for further DNA testing.

The Last Tsar: Blood and Revolution Science Museum until March 24th 2019


Pictures Of The Eight Missing Imperial Eggs / Scrap Dealer S Bargain Buy At Us Flea Market A Faberge Egg Worth Millions South China Morning Post : Third imperial egg (page 1).

Pictures Of The Eight Missing Imperial Eggs / Scrap Dealer S Bargain Buy At Us Flea Market A Faberge Egg Worth Millions South China Morning Post : Third imperial egg (page 1).. In 2007, just one egg, 'the rothschild' was sold at christies auction house for $8,9 million. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs : It's been missing since before the russian revolution, so it's definitely hidden deep. The 1889 nécessaire egg was bought from wartski in 1952 for ٟ,250 and experts. The imperial fabergé eggs are considered to be a huge treasure trove.

The most famous are those made for the russian tsars alexander iii and nicholas ii. Seven of the eggs are now missing, of this number only two are known to have survived the. Over time eight of the original 52 imperial eggs have vanished and their whereabouts remain a mystery to this day. The fabergé imperial easter eggs: Fabergé experts know of two further eggs which are in the west, says von habsburg, or which at a certain moment were in the west.

The History Blog Blog Archive Scrap Metal Dealer Finds Lost Faberge Imperial Egg from www.thehistoryblog.com The patiala necklace went missing in 1948, and was recovered fifty years later by a cartier representative with most of its precious jewels missing. The house of fabergé made 50 imperial easter eggs, of which 43 have now numbered as extant. (1886) the hen egg with sapphire pendant (1888) the cherub with chariot egg. Missing egg the royal danish egg or danish jubilee egg this is one of the biggest imperial easter eggs to have been one of the eight missing imperial faberge eggs is going on show in stock footage video jewelers stock pictures editorial images and stock photos shutterstock>. Missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. The most famous are those made for the russian tsars alexander iii and nicholas ii. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs : This is the surprise from the egg.

The egg was sold to a mystery buyer, but the other missing baubles could worth up to $45 million each.

London (ap) — there is good luck, outrageous good fortune — and now there is the case of the scrap metal dealer who found one of the eight missing faberge imperial eggs at a flea market in the american midwest. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs 17.03.2021 · missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. After the revolution, 42 of the imperial eggs made their way into private collections and museums. One of the 8 missing imperial eggs, it is known only from a single photo. Only 50 of the imperial eggs were made for the royal family, and eight remained. Missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. Third imperial egg (page 1). The eight lost imperial fabergé eggs were gifts made for russian tsars nicholas ii and alexander iii. The imperial easter eggs were fabergé's most important and demanding commissions. Only 50 of the imperial eggs were made for the royal family, and eight remained missing before the latest find, though only three of those are known to have survived the russian revolution. Two other of the original eight missing imperial eggs are known to have survived the russian revolution. A full list of missing eggs is below. The egg was supported with a gold stand on lion.

The patiala necklace went missing in 1948, and was recovered fifty years later by a cartier representative with most of its precious jewels missing. Virtually all were manufactured under the supervision of peter carl fabergé between 1885 and 1917. London (ap) — there is good luck, outrageous good fortune — and now there is the case of the scrap metal dealer who found one of the eight missing faberge imperial eggs at a flea market in the american midwest. The egg was an exquisite example of the jeweler's art: One of the 8 missing imperial eggs, it is known only from a single photo.

Hunt For The Priceless Faberge Lost Easter Egg Treasures Of The Russian Tsars Mirror Online from i2-prod.mirror.co.uk Missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. Eight, including the third imperial egg, were thought to have been lost. However, it was recently found in 2013 when a man picked it up from a flea market. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs 17.03.2021 · missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. Missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. Third imperial egg (page 1). The imperial easter eggs were fabergé's most important and demanding commissions. London (ap) — there is good luck, outrageous good fortune — and now there is the case of the scrap metal dealer who found one of the eight missing faberge imperial eggs at a flea market in the american midwest.

The imperial fabergé eggs are considered to be a huge treasure trove.

The eight lost imperial fabergé eggs were gifts made for russian tsars nicholas ii and alexander iii. The egg was supported with a gold stand on lion. .and a description written by h.c. The house of fabergé made 50 imperial easter eggs, of which 43 have now numbered as extant. Fabergé experts know of two further eggs which are in the west, says von habsburg, or which at a certain moment were in the west. London (ap) — there is good luck, outrageous good fortune — and now there is the case of the scrap metal dealer who found one of the eight missing faberge imperial eggs at a flea market in the american midwest. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs : The egg was an exquisite example of the jeweler's art: The imperial fabergé eggs are considered to be a huge treasure trove. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs 17.03.2021 · missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. They are a combination of peerless craftsmanship and inventive design. The egg was sold to a mystery buyer, but the other missing baubles could worth up to $45 million each. Two other of the original eight missing imperial eggs are known to have survived the russian revolution.

Two other of the original eight missing imperial eggs are known to have survived the russian revolution. One of the 8 missing imperial eggs, it is known only from a single photo. (1886) the hen egg with sapphire pendant (1888) the cherub with chariot egg. The imperial easter eggs were fabergé's most important and demanding commissions. It was one of fabergé's earliest commissions for the imperial family, made in 1887.

The Mysterious Fate Of The Romanov Family S Prized Easter Egg Collection History from www.history.com Seven of the eggs are now missing, of this number only two are known to have survived the. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs : Only 50 of the imperial eggs were made for the royal family, and eight remained missing before the latest find, though only three of those are known to have survived the russian revolution. In 2007, just one egg, 'the rothschild' was sold at christies auction house for $8,9 million. Missing egg the royal danish egg or danish jubilee egg this is one of the biggest imperial easter eggs to have been one of the eight missing imperial faberge eggs is going on show in stock footage video jewelers stock pictures editorial images and stock photos shutterstock>. After the revolution, 42 of the imperial eggs made their way into private collections and museums. The imperial easter eggs were fabergé's most important and demanding commissions. Over time eight of the original 52 imperial eggs have vanished and their whereabouts remain a mystery to this day.

They are a combination of peerless craftsmanship and inventive design.

After the revolution, 42 of the imperial eggs made their way into private collections and museums. Only 50 of the imperial eggs were made for the royal family, and eight remained missing before the latest find, though only three of those are known to have survived the russian revolution. The blue serpent clock egg is the 1895 egg This is the surprise from the egg. The patiala necklace went missing in 1948, and was recovered fifty years later by a cartier representative with most of its precious jewels missing. Third imperial egg (page 1). Missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. Eight, including the third imperial egg, were thought to have been lost. A full list of missing eggs is below. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs 17.03.2021 · missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. It was one of fabergé's earliest commissions for the imperial family, made in 1887. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs : The final egg that was lost to the world was the third imperial easter egg.

Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs 17.03.2021 · missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. Following the recent discoveries of the pictures of three missing fabergé imperial eggs, there are only three (out of 52) fabergé imperial eggs left for. Missing egg the royal danish egg or danish jubilee egg this is one of the biggest imperial easter eggs to have been one of the eight missing imperial faberge eggs is going on show in stock footage video jewelers stock pictures editorial images and stock photos shutterstock>. Missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. The eight lost imperial fabergé eggs were gifts made for russian tsars nicholas ii and alexander iii.

Source: static.themoscowtimes.com

The eight lost imperial fabergé eggs were gifts made for russian tsars nicholas ii and alexander iii. The 1889 nécessaire egg was bought from wartski in 1952 for ٟ,250 and experts. Over time eight of the original 52 imperial eggs have vanished and their whereabouts remain a mystery to this day. Only 50 of the imperial eggs were made for the royal family, and eight remained missing before the latest find, though only three of those are known to have survived the russian revolution. The egg was supported with a gold stand on lion.

This is the surprise from the egg. They are the 1889 necessaire egg (heavily chased gold, set with pearls and gemstones, without a. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs. They are a combination of peerless craftsmanship and inventive design. The fabergé imperial easter eggs:

The eight lost imperial fabergé eggs were gifts made for russian tsars nicholas ii and alexander iii. Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs. (1886) the hen egg with sapphire pendant (1888) the cherub with chariot egg. One of the 8 missing imperial eggs, it is known only from a single photo. Two other of the original eight missing imperial eggs are known to have survived the russian revolution.

Eggs, eggs, imperial fabergé eggs and just normal overpriced chocolate ones! When opened, the surprise inside the egg is a removable replica of the coach that carried alexandra to the coronation ceremony. The imperial fabergé eggs are considered to be a huge treasure trove. The fabergé imperial easter eggs: Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs :

By the time of the russian revolution fabergé had delivered fifty of these remarkable objects. The fate of eight imperial eggs remain a mystery. Missing egg the royal danish egg or danish jubilee egg this is one of the biggest imperial easter eggs to have been one of the eight missing imperial faberge eggs is going on show in stock footage video jewelers stock pictures editorial images and stock photos shutterstock>. Virtually all were manufactured under the supervision of peter carl fabergé between 1885 and 1917. .and a description written by h.c.

.and a description written by h.c. They are a combination of peerless craftsmanship and inventive design. The eight lost imperial fabergé eggs were. For the year 1887, a new (now missing) imperial easter egg has emerged. London (ap) — there is good luck, outrageous good fortune — and now there is the case of the scrap metal dealer who found one of the eight missing faberge imperial eggs at a flea market in the american midwest.

Source: www.thenationalnews.com

The eight lost imperial fabergé eggs were gifts made for russian tsars nicholas ii and alexander iii. A full list of missing eggs is below. The house of fabergé made 50 imperial easter eggs, of which 43 have now numbered as extant. The fate of eight imperial eggs remain a mystery. Over time eight of the original 52 imperial eggs have vanished and their whereabouts remain a mystery to this day.

Source: www.thenationalnews.com

Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs 17.03.2021 · missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. Of the eggs lost, one of the most storied was a beautiful creation known as the third imperial egg. Niue 2015 1$ third imperial egg imperial faberge.999 silver coin. Missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs. A full list of missing eggs is below.

The imperial easter eggs were fabergé's most important and demanding commissions.

Source: www.newworldencyclopedia.org

One of the 8 missing imperial eggs, it is known only from a single photo.

The imperial fabergé eggs are considered to be a huge treasure trove.

Source: static.themoscowtimes.com

The final egg that was lost to the world was the third imperial easter egg.

Missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs.

Source: d7hftxdivxxvm.cloudfront.net

Missing egg the royal danish egg or danish jubilee egg this is one of the biggest imperial easter eggs to have been one of the eight missing imperial faberge eggs is going on show in stock footage video jewelers stock pictures editorial images and stock photos shutterstock>.

One of the 8 missing imperial eggs, it is known only from a single photo.

Source: k8q7r7a2.stackpathcdn.com

The most famous are those made for the russian tsars alexander iii and nicholas ii.

/> Source: www.thejewelleryeditor.com

Seven of the eggs are now missing, of this number only two are known to have survived the.

Source: images.squarespace-cdn.com

Following the recent discoveries of the pictures of three missing fabergé imperial eggs, there are only three (out of 52) fabergé imperial eggs left for.

1886 hen egg with sapphire pendant 1888 cherub egg with chariot 1889 necessaire egg 1896 alexander iii egg 1897 i know that some jewels were dismantled and parted out—some of the imperial eggs are still missing after all this time.

/> Source: www.thejewelleryeditor.com

One of the 8 missing imperial eggs, it is known only from a single photo.

Source: p1.storage.canalblog.com

This is the surprise from the egg.

The egg was sold to a mystery buyer, but the other missing baubles could worth up to $45 million each.

One of the 8 missing imperial eggs, it is known only from a single photo.

Source: upload.wikimedia.org

It's been missing since before the russian revolution, so it's definitely hidden deep.

(1886) the hen egg with sapphire pendant (1888) the cherub with chariot egg.

This is the surprise from the egg.

They are a combination of peerless craftsmanship and inventive design.

The eight lost imperial fabergé eggs were gifts made for russian tsars nicholas ii and alexander iii.

Made by faberge for nicholas ii of russia, who presented the egg to his mother, the.

Pictures of the eight missing imperial eggs 17.03.2021 · missing imperial easter eggs, and locations of the 50 imperial fabergé eggs.

This is the surprise from the egg.

The 1895 twelve monogram egg is the same egg as the missing 1896 alexander iii portraits egg.

Fabergé's jewelled imperial easter eggs are masterpieces of the goldsmith's art


They are the Eggmen: The Rich History of the Decorative egg and How to Replicate One

Egg decorating is speculated to be one of humankind’s oldest art forms, and dates farther than the age of great antiquity in which humans decorated ostrich shell in Africa. According to Stephanie Hall of the American Folklife Center, eggs “are part of the creation myths of many peoples, the ‘cosmic egg’ from which all or parts of the universe arises. They often symbolize life, renewal, and rebirth”. We have seen colorful eggs placed on the altar in celebrations of the new year throughout Eurasia, and pure white roasted eggs included in the seder plate of Passover.

The most elaborate eggs come from Eastern Europe, where wax is used in layering intricate designs. Hall identifies two tools used to apply the wax: the kistka, a funnel stylus used to make fine lines and a round edged stylus used to drip wax, creating “elongated teardrops”. Once applied, the egg is dyed. These steps are repeated until finished. Ukrainian “pysanky” eggs predate Christianity and were originally exchanged as gifts to preserve health and reject evil. The fears and wishes that pysanky honor interact with the concrete world through the awareness that just as life is fragile, so too is the egg. In an interview with NPR, Pysanka artist Paul Wirhun stated that the egg is more than a symbolic object—it’s a powerful object as well. Moreover, as subject to the life cycle, the egg is just as testimonial as it is evocative: “It wasn’t just a representation of new life, it was new life”. For those who feel inspired by the pysanky technique, you can practice the implementation of wax at home. Try melting down Paraffin wax, or using a white crayon, to draw a design on your egg. Areas coated with wax will not be affected by dye. Dip your egg into your lightest dye. Continue adding more wax as you please, and be sure to move from light to dark colors.

The emergence of Christianity brought new tradition to the egg. Throughout the medieval period, the consumption of eggs was forbidden during Lent. Thus, eggs became an integral part of the Easter Sunday celebration. In 1290, Edward I purchased 450 eggs to be decorated. The German Easter egg hunt became popular in the United Kingdom in the 1800s when Queen Victoria’s German-born mother orchestrated hunts for the royal family at Kensington Palace. Historian Dr. Andrew Hann speculates that the eggs were hard-boiled with onion skins, as central European eggs were often dyed using lichens and vegetables. Northern British and Scandinavian eggs often have a leaf or floral impression which is achieved by placing a flower at the top of an egg before wrapping and boiling it. These eggs are called “pace eggs”, derivative of Pascha, the Latin word for Easter. To create your own natural dyes, bring 2 cups of water (and an optional 2 tablespoons of white vinegar). Then add a coloring agent and reduce for at least 30 minutes. Let cool for 2-3 hours, then place your egg into the dye. Leave it until you have achieved your desired color. Allrecipes.com suggests: 1.5 cups of shredded beats for purple/pink 7 onion skins for rusty yellow 3 tablespoons of turmeric or cumin for bright yellow 3 tablespoons of chili powder for orange 1.5 cups of shredded red lettuce for sky blue and 2 cups of spinach for green. Leaving an egg in 2 cups of juice or coffee can also do the trick. To make your own pace egg, wrap an onion skin tightly around a leaf or flower placed on the egg.

For Easter of 1885, Czar Alexander III sought to charm his wife Maria Feodorovna, and commissioned jeweler and goldsmith Peter Carl Fabergé to make the first of 50 “immensely personal, yet gloriously flamboyant” eggs (Morton, 2019). These eggs are now considered to be the “last commissions of objets d’art” (faberge.com). For his first piece, Fabergé created a simple white egg which twisted open to reveal a golden yolk holding a golden hen holding a miniature diamond crown holding a ruby pendant. First deceivingly simple, the eggs grew to be evidently embellished as Fabergé decorated them with enamel, velvet, pearl, silver, diamonds, and rock crystal. Disruptions aside, the tradition lasted until 1917 when the Imperial family was executed following the Bolshevik’s February Revolution. Under Lenin’s orders, the royals’ valuables were packed and sent to the Kremlin, and in response to a tanking economy in the 1920s and 30s, Russian leaders sold the eggs. Presently, we are aware of the whereabouts of 42 Fabergé eggs—the remaining 8 are yet to be found. Though the lavish interior of a Fabergé egg might be difficult to replicate at home, the exterior can be replicated using a variety of creative embellishments. Make your own Fabergé egg by painting a beautiful design, or gluing whatever bits of fabric, glitter, gemstone, jewelry, beads, or other trinkets you can find.

The history of the decorated egg is vast and predates Christianity and the development of the Western world. Delicate and lovely, these eggs have withstood centuries of elegance, conflict, and evolution. By decorating our own eggs, we are not only reliving the childhood custom of spring time crafts, but we are paying homage to one of the world’s richest and most reverent artistic traditions.


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The Mysterious Fate of the Romanov Family's Prized Easter Egg Collection - HISTORY

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Easter Special: The Story Behind The Fabulous Fabergé Eggs – Reprise

When they hear the name Fabergé, most people immediately think of imperial Easter eggs. This is logical because even today the breathtaking craftsmanship and detailed execution of these objets d’art are the stuff of legends.

Fabergé was founded in 1842 by Gustav Fabergé, but it was his son Peter Carl (1846-1920) that truly drove the family business to new heights.

Peter Carl Fabergé’s story is a European one. Born into a Huguenot refugee family in St. Petersburg, Russia, he relocated some 14 years later with his family to Dresden, Germany. After extensive studies and travels in central Europe, Fabergé finally returned to the place of his birth a fully trained craftsman.

The year was 1870, and Russia was in the throes of the luxury-hungry tsarist regime. Peter Carl Fabergé took over the Fabergé jewelry shop on Bolshaya Morskaya Street in St. Petersburg that his father Gustav had opened in 1842. And it was here that he instituted a new system of workshop masters to oversee and create objects in Fabergé’s name and style.

The Fabergé Bay Tree imperial egg of 1911 (photo courtesy The Forbes Collection)

His workshop masters – exceptional craftsmen all – attained fame of their own throughout the years and helped Fabergé create a legacy of more than 150,000 objects.

Throughout the century and more since Fabergé entered the world’s jewelry stage, it has been best known for two things: translucent enameling over guilloché and Easter eggs, both of which actually go hand in hand.

Fabergé’s restoration work on objects in the collection of the Hermitage Museum caught the attention of Tsar Alexander III. Taken with Fabergé’s work, in 1885 he bestowed upon him the title of “goldsmith by special appointment to the imperial crown.”

How the egg tradition hatched

That same year, 1885, Tsar Alexander III also commissioned his first Easter egg from Fabergé as a gift to his wife, Empress Maria Feodorovna. This became a yearly tradition, with Fabergé creating 50 eggs in total for the Russian court.

The Russian imperial family took the Easter tradition of giving eggs (a symbol of new life in the springtime) as gifts very seriously.

These eggs were exuberant showcases of traditional decorative techniques such as gem-setting, hand-turned guilloché, and high-fire enamel. At the heart of most of those eggs was a surprise — automata, miniature paintings, and jeweled replicas of places and objects significant to the imperial Romanov family.

The Fabergé Hen Egg of 1885 kicked off the imperial Russian family’s egg tradition (photo courtesy The Forbes Collection)

Between 1885 and 1916, Fabergé created fifty egg-shaped Easter gifts for the tsar’s family, most of which were commissioned as surprises. The first imperial egg, a simple chicken egg containing a golden bejeweled hen, was, as previously mentioned, a gift from Tsar Alexander III to his Danish wife, Empress Maria Feodorovna. And from that point, the legacy only grew.

The Fabergé Hen Egg of 1885 closed (photo courtesy The Forbes Collection)

The Hen Egg, now located at the Fabergé Museum in St. Petersburg, features an opaque white enameled shell. When opened, a matte yellow gold yolk is revealed. The yolk in turn contains an enameled and chased gold hen that once held a replica of the Russian imperial crown with a ruby pendant (the empress’s Easter gift).

Fabergé made ten eggs in the eight years before Tsar Alexander III’s death.

The Fabergé Rosebud Egg from 1895 (photo courtesy The Forbes Collection)

The Fabergé workshop created another 40 eggs between 1893 and 1916 during the reign of Alexander III’s son, Nicholas II: two appeared each year, one each for mother and wife.

Another of these eggs, also at home at the Fabergé Museum in St. Petersburg, is the Rosebud Egg of 1895, which Nicholas II presented to Empress Alexandra Feodorovna a few months after they married. Comprising multi-colored gold, rose-cut diamonds, and translucent red enamel over guilloché, the inside surprise is a miniature portrait of the emperor underneath a table-cut diamond.

Other jewelry surprises contained therein have been lost.

While the eggs were unlikely to have been very profitable to the jeweler’s business due to the enormous amount of craftwork and precious materials that went into them, Fabergé was very proud of them.

Tsarina Feodorovna was in awe of the beautifully crafted Easter eggs and described Fabergé as a genius as well as the “greatest artist of the century.”

The Fabergé Coronation Egg from 1897 (photo courtesy The Forbes Collection)

Nicholas II gifted his new wife the Coronation Egg of 1897 on the day of their coronation in Uspensky Cathedral. The design of the egg comprising multi-colored gold, translucent yellow enamel over guilloché and black double-headed eagles set with diamonds was reminiscent of the radiant cloth of gold robe she wore that day.

The little gold coach surprise, an enameled gold miniature replica (only 9.4 centimeters in length) of an original eighteenth-century carriage by Buckendahl, took craftsman Georg Stein 13 months to complete. This egg is also located at the Fabergé Museum in St. Petersburg.

Many of the eggs he created for her included surprises related to her personal life such as images of her son and his family or, in the case of the Caucasus egg from 1893 by workmaster Michael Perkhin, an image of the house where her son, the Grand Duke George, spent a large part of his life upon being diagnosed with incurable tuberculosis.

The last egg, made in the year of the October Revolution, was named the War Egg.

Forty-two of the original Easter eggs still remain spread out across the world. The others were stolen during the Russian Revolution.

The mysterious Constellation Egg

The Russian Revolution ended the tradition of the imperial Easter eggs.

The final egg from the historical Fabergé workshop under Peter Carl Fabergé was the Constellation Egg, which should have been presented to Tsarina Alexandra for Easter in 1917.

It featured an engraving of the constellation of Leo, alluding to the birth date of Tsarevich Alexei, heir to the throne. Shortly before it could be completed, however, the Russian Revolution broke out. Subsequently, Tsar Nicholas II abdicated, the imperial regime fell, the Fabergé family went into exile, and the Constellation Egg vanished.

Inside the original Fabergé workshop (photo courtesy Dr. Geza von Habsburg)

The Constellation Egg resurfaced in 1922, though only in correspondence between Eugène Fabergé and François Birbaum, Fabergé’s chief designer from 1895 to 1918.

In this letter, Birbaum described the egg as comprising blue glass on a cloud-shaped pedestal of opaque rock crystal.

Travelling at the speed of light, light from a star can take decades to reach the earth. The light leaving the brightest star in the constellation of Leo in 1922, when that letter was written, would only have reached the earth in 1999.

And as fate would have it, in 1999 the original drawing of the Constellation Egg came to light, confirming Birbaum’s description. Just two years later, benefiting from the original drawing, the incomplete pieces of the Constellation Egg — the clouds of rock crystal and two empty halves of a blue glass egg — were identified in a storeroom of the Fersman Mineralogical Museum in Moscow.

In 1918, Fabergé fled Russia after the Bolsheviks nationalized his business. He settled in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he died on September 24, 1920.

Post-1917 eggs

Victor Mayer was a Fabergé workmaster, the term used for the overseer of the workshop and craftsmen, from 1990 until 2015.

Managed by Dr. Marcus O. Mohr, a fourth generation Mayer, Victor Mayer created a new generation of eggs, starting with the first post-revolutionary egg presented to Mikhail Gorbachev as he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, the Gorbachev Peace Egg.

The eggs are the most complicated objects that Victor Mayer manufactured under the Fabergé label (it also manufactured enamel jewelry, watches, and other objets d’art).

Nine different crafts were required to complete them, and during a tour of the facility in the mid-2000s Mohr described them to me as the company’s “greatest source of pride.”

A Victor Mayer Fabergé egg with a polar bear family as the surprise inside

One example makes it clear why this is so: one of Victor Mayer’s Fabergé eggs features a winter scene with a family of polar bears when the top of the egg is opened. The “snow” covering the bottom of the scene inside the egg is in reality rock crystal taken directly from a druse. In order to find just one perfect piece to use as snow, five to ten druses must be opened and thoroughly examined.

The most complicated mechanical egg Fabergé ever created was completed in collaboration with workmaster Victor Mayer and master watchmaker Paul Gerber of Zurich: the Moon Phase Clock Egg from 2001.

A new continuation

The Pearl Egg of 2015, a breathtaking unique piece, revived the tradition of the imperial eggs under Fabergé’s new owner, Gemfields.

The Fabergé Pearl Egg, 2015

However, instead of being created for Russian royalty, the owner of this latest egg is Hussain Ibrahim Al-Fardan, a man from a family of one of the oldest and the most successful pearl traders in the Gulf region (see Fabergé Pearl Egg: The First Imperial-Class Egg In Nearly 100 Years).

We can only hope to see more of these in the future.

Quick Facts Fabergé Pearl Egg
Surprise pearl: grey, Arabian, 12.17 ct
Shell: white and yellow gold with 139 white, golden-luster pearls 3,305 diamonds carved rock crystal mother-of-pearl
Mechanics: rotating outer shell on base opens and closes the six “petals”
Limitation: one unique piece
Price: undisclosed figure

*
This article was first published on April 14, 2017 at A Brief History Of Fabulous Fabergé Eggs.


5 things you didn’t know about Fabergé eggs

For anyone new to the world of Fabergé eggs, there are a few key things to know as a basis. A Fabergé egg is a type of bejewelled egg, created originally by Peter Carl Fabergé from the jewellery firm House of Fabergé . There were 50 original imperial eggs created for the Russian imperial family between 1885 and 1916, however, some sources report 52 being created. Beyond this collection, it's believed there were as many as 69 eggs made in total, and 61 still linger today – which is exactly why they're so prized.

1. Fabergé Eggs were Easter gifts

Never mind chocolate for Easter, the Tsars had more opulent ideas for gifts. The story began with Tsar Alexander III in 1885. His young wife, Maria Flodorovna was born Dagmar of Denmark, but was sent away from her family for an arranged marriage to the Tsar of Russia. Feeling alone and in a foreign land, Maria suffered from homesickness and depression. Seeing her sadness, the Tsar commissioned a jewelled egg as an Easter gift for his wife - the very first Fabergé egg. Maria was delighted with the exquisite egg and so it became a tradition that the eggs would be made, two each year, as gifts for the wives and mothers of the aristocracy. A happy Easter indeed.

2. Some Fabergé Eggs are missing

After the fatal fall of the Romanov family during the Russian Revolution, the Imperial eggs were looted and scattered throughout the world, creating one of the most intriguing Easter egg hunts ever. Some are in private collections, some are in museums and some have vanished without a trace. One of them, the Imperial Fabergé Nécessaire Egg, crafted in 1889, was known to have survived the revolution, and was sold in 1952 by a family of antique dealers to a mysterious buyer listed only as ‘a stranger’. After that, its location became unknown. This egg was richly set with diamonds, rubies and emeralds, and was intended to hold beauty tools, such as hairpins and makeup brushes. As for its whereabouts now? Nobody knows.

  • One of the missing Imperial Fabergé Eggs - TheNécessaire Egg
  • Image source: Andre J. Koymasky

3. The Queen of England owns three

It’s perhaps no surprise that because of their rarity and elusiveness, Fabergé eggs are the ultimate collector’s objects. The British King George V and Queen Mary were huge fans of Fabergé objects and so in 1933, they purchased three exquisite imperial eggs – the Colonnade Egg Clock, the Basket of Flowers Egg and the Mosaic Egg. The eggs now belong to Queen Elizabeth II, who also owns multiple other Fabergé collectables including ornaments, boxes and photo frames.

  • The Mosaic Egg - one of the three Fabergé eggs owned by The Queen of England
  • Image source: BBC

4. One was nearly melted

Several years ago, a €20 million Fabergé egg wound up sitting unidentified at an antiques market in the United States. Like several others, the egg had been lost for years. It was last seen in public in March 1902 and ended up being purchased for €8,000 by a humble scrap metal dealer. Without knowing the treasure he had just bought, he planned to melt down the egg for its gold - until he stumbled upon an online article revealing it to be a €20 million Fabergé egg in 2012. Having sat in a kitchen for years, the egg now rests with a private collector, and has gone on public display on a few occasions.

5. The House of Fabergé had extremely humble beginnings

Peter Carl Fabergé wasn’t always the official jeweller of the Russian Imperial Court. In fact he wasn't even Russian. So how did this happen? Peter’s father, Gustav Fabergé trained as an ordinary goldsmith in St. Petersburg, before opening up a basement floor jewellery shop. Born in 1846, Peter then followed in his father’s footsteps and underwent extensive training, tuition and study of goldsmithery. In 1882, he took over the family business when his father passed away, and that year Tsar Alexander III saw some of Fabergé’s work at an exhibition. The Tsar was captivated, and ordered the items to be displayed in the country’s Hermitage Museum as examples of first-rate modern Russian craftsmanship. By 1885, The House of Fabergé had been commissioned to make the first imperial egg, and a legacy was born.

While the opulence of the original, imperial eggs remains limited to the first series produced under Peter Carl Fabergé, the House of Fabergé has continued to make luxury eggs, exquisite jewellery and objects d’art for a century.

Find some of these treasures in our Fabergé Imperial Collection themed auctions . Or register to become a seller and offer up your our Fabergé collectables for auction.


The Mysterious Fate of the Romanov Family's Prized Easter Egg Collection - HISTORY

Heat-oxidized yellow titanium case

High performance escapement with &ldquotriple pare-chute&rdquo protection

Patented spherical moonphase

Floating lugs maximize comfort on wrist

A Brief History Of Fabulous Fabergé Eggs

When they hear the name Fabergé, most people immediately think of imperial Easter eggs. This is logical because even today the breathtaking craftsmanship and detailed execution of these objets d’art are the stuff of legends.

Fabergé was founded in 1842 by Gustav Fabergé, but it was his son Peter Carl (1846-1920) that truly drove the family business to new heights.

Peter Carl Fabergé’s story is a European one. Born into a Huguenot refugee family in St. Petersburg, Russia, he relocated some 14 years later with his family to Dresden, Germany. After extensive studies and travels in central Europe, Fabergé finally returned to the place of his birth a fully trained craftsman.

The year was 1870, and Russia was in the throes of the luxury-hungry tsarist regime. Peter Carl Fabergé took over the Fabergé jewelry shop on Bolshaya Morskaya Street in St. Petersburg that his father Gustav had opened in 1842. And it was here that he instituted a new system of workshop masters to oversee and create objects in Fabergé’s name and style.

The Fabergé Bay Tree imperial egg of 1911 (photo courtesy The Forbes Collection)

His workshop masters – exceptional craftsmen all – attained fame of their own throughout the years and helped Fabergé create a legacy of more than 150,000 objects.

Throughout the century and more since Fabergé entered the world’s jewelry stage, it has been best known for two things: translucent enameling over guilloché and Easter eggs, both of which actually go hand in hand.

Fabergé’s restoration work on objects in the collection of the Hermitage Museum caught the attention of Tsar Alexander III. Taken with Fabergé’s work, in 1885 he bestowed upon him the title of “goldsmith by special appointment to the imperial crown.”

How the egg tradition hatched

That same year, 1885, Tsar Alexander III also commissioned his first Easter egg from Fabergé as a gift to his wife, Empress Maria Feodorovna. This became a yearly tradition, with Fabergé creating 50 eggs in total for the Russian court.

The Russian imperial family took the Easter tradition of giving eggs (a symbol of new life in the springtime) as gifts very seriously.

These eggs were exuberant showcases of traditional decorative techniques such as gem-setting, hand-turned guilloché, and high-fire enamel. At the heart of most of those eggs was a surprise — automata, miniature paintings, and jeweled replicas of places and objects significant to the imperial Romanov family.

The Fabergé Hen Egg of 1885 kicked off the imperial Russian family’s egg tradition (photo courtesy The Forbes Collection)

Between 1885 and 1916, Fabergé created fifty egg-shaped Easter gifts for the tsar’s family, most of which were commissioned as surprises. The first imperial egg, a simple chicken egg containing a golden bejeweled hen, was, as previously mentioned, a gift from Tsar Alexander III to his Danish wife, Empress Maria Feodorovna. And from that point, the legacy only grew.

The Fabergé Hen Egg of 1885 closed (photo courtesy The Forbes Collection)

The Hen Egg, now located at the Fabergé Museum in St. Petersburg, features an opaque white enameled shell. When opened, a matte yellow gold yolk is revealed. The yolk in turn contains an enameled and chased gold hen that once held a replica of the Russian imperial crown with a ruby pendant (the empress’s Easter gift).

Fabergé made ten eggs in the eight years before Tsar Alexander III’s death.

The Fabergé Rosebud Egg from 1895 (photo courtesy The Forbes Collection)

The Fabergé workshop created another 40 eggs between 1893 and 1916 during the reign of Alexander III’s son, Nicholas II: two appeared each year, one each for mother and wife.

Another of these eggs, also at home at the Fabergé Museum in St. Petersburg, is the Rosebud Egg of 1895, which Nicholas II presented to Empress Alexandra Feodorovna a few months after they married. Comprising multi-colored gold, rose-cut diamonds, and translucent red enamel over guilloché, the inside surprise is a miniature portrait of the emperor underneath a table-cut diamond.

Other jewelry surprises contained therein have been lost.

While the eggs were unlikely to have been very profitable to the jeweler’s business due to the enormous amount of craftwork and precious materials that went into them, Fabergé was very proud of them.

Tsarina Feodorovna was in awe of the beautifully crafted Easter eggs and described Fabergé as a genius as well as the “greatest artist of the century.”

The Fabergé Coronation Egg from 1897 (photo courtesy The Forbes Collection)

Nicholas II gifted his new wife the Coronation Egg of 1897 on the day of their coronation in Uspensky Cathedral. The design of the egg comprising multi-colored gold, translucent yellow enamel over guilloché and black double-headed eagles set with diamonds was reminiscent of the radiant cloth of gold robe she wore that day.

The little gold coach surprise, an enameled gold miniature replica (only 9.4 centimeters in length) of an original eighteenth-century carriage by Buckendahl, took craftsman Georg Stein 13 months to complete. This egg is also located at the Fabergé Museum in St. Petersburg.

Many of the eggs he created for her included surprises related to her personal life such as images of her son and his family or, in the case of the Caucasus egg from 1893 by workmaster Michael Perkhin, an image of the house where her son, the Grand Duke George, spent a large part of his life upon being diagnosed with incurable tuberculosis.

The last egg, made in the year of the October Revolution, was named the War Egg.

Forty-two of the original Easter eggs still remain spread out across the world. The others were stolen during the Russian Revolution.

The mysterious Constellation Egg

The Russian Revolution ended the tradition of the imperial Easter eggs.

The final egg from the historical Fabergé workshop under Peter Carl Fabergé was the Constellation Egg, which should have been presented to Tsarina Alexandra for Easter in 1917.

It featured an engraving of the constellation of Leo, alluding to the birth date of Tsarevich Alexei, heir to the throne. Shortly before it could be completed, however, the Russian Revolution broke out. Subsequently, Tsar Nicholas II abdicated, the imperial regime fell, the Fabergé family went into exile, and the Constellation Egg vanished.

Inside the original Fabergé workshop (photo courtesy Dr. Geza von Habsburg)

The Constellation Egg resurfaced in 1922, though only in correspondence between Eugène Fabergé and François Birbaum, Fabergé’s chief designer from 1895 to 1918.

In this letter, Birbaum described the egg as comprising blue glass on a cloud-shaped pedestal of opaque rock crystal.

Travelling at the speed of light, light from a star can take decades to reach the earth. The light leaving the brightest star in the constellation of Leo in 1922, when that letter was written, would only have reached the earth in 1999.

And as fate would have it, in 1999 the original drawing of the Constellation Egg came to light, confirming Birbaum’s description. Just two years later, benefiting from the original drawing, the incomplete pieces of the Constellation Egg — the clouds of rock crystal and two empty halves of a blue glass egg — were identified in a storeroom of the Fersman Mineralogical Museum in Moscow.

In 1918, Fabergé fled Russia after the Bolsheviks nationalized his business. He settled in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he died on September 24, 1920.

Post-1917 eggs

Victor Mayer was a Fabergé workmaster, the term used for the overseer of the workshop and craftsmen, from 1990 until 2015.

Managed by Dr. Marcus O. Mohr, a fourth generation Mayer, Victor Mayer created a new generation of eggs, starting with the first post-revolutionary egg presented to Mikhail Gorbachev as he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, the Gorbachev Peace Egg.

The eggs are the most complicated objects that Victor Mayer manufactured under the Fabergé label (it also manufactured enamel jewelry, watches, and other objets d’art).

Nine different crafts were required to complete them, and during a tour of the facility in the mid-2000s Mohr described them to me as the company’s “greatest source of pride.”

A Victor Mayer Fabergé egg with a polar bear family as the surprise inside

One example makes it clear why this is so: one of Victor Mayer’s Fabergé eggs features a winter scene with a family of polar bears when the top of the egg is opened. The “snow” covering the bottom of the scene inside the egg is in reality rock crystal taken directly from a druse. In order to find just one perfect piece to use as snow, five to ten druses must be opened and thoroughly examined.

The most complicated mechanical egg Fabergé ever created was completed in collaboration with workmaster Victor Mayer and master watchmaker Paul Gerber of Zurich: the Moon Phase Clock Egg from 2001.

A new continuation

The Pearl Egg of 2015, a breathtaking unique piece, revived the tradition of the imperial eggs under Fabergé’s new owner, Gemfields.

The Fabergé Pearl Egg, 2015

However, instead of being created for Russian royalty, the owner of this latest egg is Hussain Ibrahim Al-Fardan, a man from a family of one of the oldest and the most successful pearl traders in the Gulf region (see Fabergé Pearl Egg: The First Imperial-Class Egg In Nearly 100 Years).

We can only hope to see more of these in the future.

Quick Facts Fabergé Pearl Egg
Surprise pearl: grey, Arabian, 12.17 ct
Shell: white and yellow gold with 139 white, golden-luster pearls 3,305 diamonds carved rock crystal mother-of-pearl
Mechanics: rotating outer shell on base opens and closes the six “petals”
Limitation: one unique piece
Price: undisclosed figure


Art Blart

Even after nearly six years of making this website, I still get a thrill bringing you the next posting.

Even as their countrymen lay starving in the cities and dying on the fields of battle in World War One, the Romanov’s still kept spending. Oh how the once mighty fell in a heap of their own making. But sometimes you just need a bit of dynastic, debauched (and beautiful) bling to brighten your capitalist day … and to remind you that nothing lasts forever and karma will always have its way.

As a t-shirt in an op-shop that I saw today said, “Workers … possess the power.” And that is why governments, tyrants and despotic royalty will always be afraid of them.

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Many thankx to the Oklahoma City Museum of Art for allowing me to publish the photographs in the posting. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

Pavel Ovchinnikov (1830-1888)
The Holy Virgin of Kazan, Saint Prince Aleksandr Nevskii, Saint Mary Magdalene
1891
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt.
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Pavel Ovchinnikov (1830-1888), Russian jeweller, silversmith, goldsmith, enameller, merchant, industrialist. Hallmark: П.О. or П.Овчинниковъ in a rectangle. Trained in his brother’s workshop and opened a factory in Moscow, where he revived the art of enamelling and worked in the Neo-Russian style. Official purveyor to Tsar Alexander III, Grand Duke Mikhail Nikolaevich, King Victor Emmanuel II of Italy and King Christian IX of Denmark. Awarded the Légion d’honneur and the Order of the Iron Crown. Member of the Moscow City Duma.

Alexander Yaroslavich Nevsky (Russian: Алекса́ндр Яросла́вич Не́вский pronounced [ɐlʲɪˈksandr jɪrɐˈslavʲɪtɕ ˈnʲɛfskʲɪj] Ukrainian: Олександр Ярославович Не́вський) 13 May 1221 – 14 November 1263) served as Prince of Novgorod, Grand Prince of Kiev and Grand Prince of Vladimir during some of the most difficult times in Kievan Rus’ history.

Commonly regarded as a key figure of medieval Rus’, Alexander – the grandson of Vsevolod the Big Nest – rose to legendary status on account of his military victories over German and Swedish invaders while agreeing to pay tribute to the powerful Golden Horde. He was proclaimed as a saint of the Russian Orthodox Church by Metropolite Macarius in 1547. Popular polls rank Alexander Nevsky as the greatest Russian hero in history.

Russian
Imperial Diamond Brooch
1890-1910
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Russian
Crown Brooch
1890-1910
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Elephant Box
before 1899
Nephrite, ivory, gold, rubies, diamonds
3.75 x 4 (diameter) in. (9.53 x 10.16 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Upon the death of Hiskias Pendin in 1882, Carl Fabergé took sole responsibility for running the company. Carl was awarded the title Master Goldsmith, which permitted him to use his own hallmark in addition to that of the firm. Carl Fabergé’s reputation was so high that the normal three-day examination was waived. For several years, Carl Faberge’s main assistant in the designing of jewellery was his younger brother, Agathon Faberge (1862-1895), who had also trained in Dresden.

Carl and Agathon were a sensation at the Pan-Russian Exhibition held in Moscow in 1882. Carl was awarded a gold medal and the St. Stanisias Medal. One of the Fabergé pieces displayed was a replica of a 4th-century BC gold bangle from the Scythian Treasure in the Hermitage. The Tsar declared that he could not distinguish the Fabergé’s work from the original and ordered that objects by the House of Fabergé should be displayed in the Hermitage as examples of superb contemporary Russian craftsmanship. The House of Fabergé with its range of jewels was now within the focus of Russia’s Imperial Court.

When Peter Carl took over the House, there was a move from producing jewellery in the then fashionable French 18th century style, to becoming artist-jewellers. Having acquired the title of Supplier to the Court from Tsar Alexander III on May 1, 1885, Fabergé had full access to the important Hermitage Collection, where he was able not only to study but also to find inspiration for developing his unique style. Influenced by the jewelled bouquets created by the eighteenth century goldsmiths, Jean-Jacques Duval and Jérémie Pauzié, Fabergé re-worked their ideas, combining them with his accurate observations and fascination for Japanese art. This resulted in reviving the lost art of enamelling and concentrating on setting every single stone in a piece to its best advantage. Indeed, it was not unusual for Agathon to make ten or more wax models so that all possibilities could be exhausted before deciding on a final design. Shortly after Agathon joined the firm, the House introduced objects deluxe: gold bejewelled items embellished with enamel ranging from electric bell pushes to cigarette cases, including objects de fantaisie.

In 1885, Tsar Alexander III gave the House of Fabergé the title ‘Goldsmith by special appointment to the Imperial Crown’.

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Elephant Box (detail)
before 1899
Nephrite, ivory, gold, rubies, diamonds
3.75 x 4 (diameter) in. (9.53 x 10.16 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Monumental Kovsh
1899-1908
Silver, chrysoprase, amethyst
15 x 27.5 x 12.25 in. (38.10 x 69.85 x 31.12 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Jerome and Rita Gans Collection of Silver
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Monumental Kovsh (detail)
1899-1908
Silver, chrysoprase, amethyst
15 x 27.5 x 12.25 in. (38.10 x 69.85 x 31.12 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Jerome and Rita Gans Collection of Silver
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

The Kovsh is a traditional drinking vessel or ladle from Russia. It was oval-shaped like a boat with a single handle and may be shaped like a water bird or a norse longship. Originally the Kovsh made from wood and used to serve and drink mead, with specimens excavated from as early as the tenth century. Metal Kovsh began to appear around the 14th century, although it also continued to be carved out of wood and was frequently brightly painted in peasant motifs. By the 17th century, the Kovsh was often an ornament rather than a practical vessel, and in the 19th century it was elaborately cast in precious metals for presentation as an official gift of the tsarist government.

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Star Frame
before 1899
Gold, enamel, pearls, glass, ivory
3 x 2.625 x 3.5625 (diameter) in (7.62 x 6.67 x 9.05 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Star Frame (detail)
before 1899
Gold, enamel, pearls, glass, ivory
3 x 2.625 x 3.5625 (diameter) in (7.62 x 6.67 x 9.05 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Fedor Rückert (Russian, 1840-1917)
Plate
1899-1908
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Jerome and Rita Gans Collection of Silver
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Feodor Ivanovich Rückert, Russian silver- and goldsmith of German origin, Fabergé workmaster. Born in Moscow in 1840. Worked with Carl Fabergé from 1887. His mark Ф.Р. (F.R. in Russian Cyrillic) can be found on cloisonné enamel objects made in Moscow, sold independently or by Fabergé.

Fedor Rückert (Russian, 1840-1917)
Plate (detail)
1899-1908
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Jerome and Rita Gans Collection of Silver
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

“More than 230 rare and storied treasures created by the House of Fabergé will be celebrated in a new exhibition at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. Fabergé: Jeweler to the Tsars will be on view from June 20 through September 27, 2015. The exhibition, drawn from the Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, will showcase Karl Fabergé’s fine craftsmanship in pieces of jewelry and adornments once belonging to the Russian Imperial family.

“This exhibition represents a double honor for the Oklahoma City Museum of Art – the opportunity to collaborate with the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and to showcase the largest Fabergé collection outside of Russia,” said E. Michael Whittington, OKCMOA President and CEO. “The technical and artistic virtuosity of the Fabergé workshop is without parallel. Individually, these objects are breathtaking. Collectively, they represent a unique window into an empire and subsequent revolution that dramatically altered 20th century history. We are proud to present such an extraordinary collection of treasures to our community.”

From dazzling Imperial Easter eggs to delicate flower ornaments and from enchanting animal sculptures to cigarette cases, photograph frames and desk clocks, Fabergé often turned the most mundane objects into miniature works of art. The vast majority of his designs were never repeated, and most pieces were made entirely by hand. The success of his business was inextricably linked to the patronage of the Romanov dynasty and the close ties among the British, Danish and Russian royal families, who often exchanged works by Fabergé as personal gifts.

The Imperial Tsesarevich Easter Egg of 1912, which will be on view at OKCMOA, was a gift to Empress Alexandra from her husband, Emperor Nicholas II. The egg commemorates their son, Alexsei, who nearly died the previous year of hemophilia. For the shell, craftsmen joined six wedges of highly prized lapis lazuli and hid the seams with an elaborate gold filigree encasement. Inside the egg, a diamond encrusted Romanov family crest frames a two-sided portrait of the young child.

These objects were associated with refinement and luxury because the House of Fabergé was known for accepting nothing less than perfection as well as for being business savvy. Beyond the elegant showrooms in Moscow and Saint Petersburg, hundreds of the country’s finest goldsmiths, enamellers, stone carvers, gem cutters and jewelers were at work creating innovative and complex designs that could not be readily imitated.

The presence of the Romanov family – Emperor Nicholas II, Empress Alexandra and their five children – is most intimately felt in the exhibition through the display of more than 40 family photographs held in enameled Fabergé frames. These family photographs and jewels were some of the only possessions the Romanovs took with them when they were forced out of St. Petersburg during the Revolution. In an effort to preserve their wealth, the Romanov daughters are said to have sewn Fabergé jewels into their undergarments. In the end, their diamond-lined corsets managed to prolong their execution and sealed the fate for the inevitable fall of the dynasty.”

Press release from the Oklahoma City Museum of Art

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Christ Pantocrator
1914-17
Oil on panel, silver gilt, filigree silver, precious and semiprecious stones, seed pearls
11.875 x 10.125 in. (30.16 x 25.72 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

In Christian iconography, Christ Pantocrator refers to a specific depiction of Christ. Pantocrator or Pantokrator (Greek: Παντοκράτωρ) is, used in this context, a translation of one of many names of God in Judaism. When the Hebrew Bible was translated into Greek as the Septuagint, Pantokrator was used both for YHWH Sabaoth “Lord of Hosts” and for El Shaddai “God Almighty”. In the New Testament, Pantokrator is used once by Paul (2 Cor 6:18). Aside from that one occurrence, the author of the Book of Revelation is the only New Testament author to use the word Pantokrator. The author of Revelation uses the word nine times, and while the references to God and Christ in Revelation are at times interchangeable, Pantokrator appears to be reserved for God alone.

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Mikhail Perkhin, Workmaster Russian , 1860-1903
Vasilii Zuiev, Painter of miniatures Russian , 1870-unknown
Imperial Peter the Great Easter Egg
1903
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter, the Great Egg, is a jewelled Easter egg made under the supervision of the Russian jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé in 1903, for the last Tsar of Russia, Nicholas II. Tsar Nicholas presented the egg to his wife, the Czarina Alexandra Fyodorovna. Made in the Rococo style, the Peter the Great Egg celebrated the two-hundredth anniversary of the founding of St. Petersburg in 1703.

Executed in gold, the curves are set with diamonds and rubies. The body of the egg is covered in laurel leaves and bulrushes that are chased in 14-carat green gold. These symbolize the source of the “living waters”. The spikyheads are set with square rubies. White enamel ribbons inscribed with historical details encircle the egg. On the top of the egg is an enameled wreath which encircles Nicholas II’s monogram. The bottom of the egg is adorned with the double-headed imperial eagle, made of black enamel and crowned with two diamonds.

The paintings representing the “before” and “after” of St. Petersburg in 1703 and 1903. The front painting features the extravagant Winter Palace, the official residence of Nicholas II two hundred years after the founding of St. Petersburg. Opposite this, on the back of the egg, is a painting of the log cabin believed to be built by Peter the Great himself, representative of the founding of St. Petersburg on the banks of the Neva River. On the sides of the egg are portraits of Peter the Great in 1703 and Nicholas II in 1903. Each of the miniatures is covered by rock crystal. The dates 1703 and 1903, worked in diamonds, appear on either side of the lid above the paintings of the log cabin and Winter Palace, respectively.

Below each painting are fluttering enamel ribbons with inscriptions in black Cyrillic letters. The inscriptions include: “The Emperor Peter the Great, born in 1672, founding St. Petersburg in 1703”, “The first little house of the Emperor Peter the Great in 1703”, “The Emperor Nicholas II born in the 1868 ascended the throne in 1894” and “The Winter Palace of His Imperial Majesty in 1903.”

The surprise is that when the egg is opened, a mechanism within raises a miniature gold model of Peter the Great’s monument on the Neva, resting on a base of sapphire. The model was made by Gerogii Malychevin. The reason for this choice of surprise is the story of a legend from the 19th century that says enemy forces will never take St. Petersburg while the “Bronze Horseman” stands in the middle of the city.

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Mikhail Perkhin, Workmaster Russian , 1860-1903
Vasilii Zuiev, Painter of miniatures Russian , 1870-unknown
Imperial Peter the Great Easter Egg (detail)
1903
Gold, platinum, diamonds, rubies, enamel, bronze, sapphire, watercolor on ivory, rock crystal
4.25 x 3.125 (diameter) in. (10.80 x 7.94 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Henrik Wigström Russian, 1862-1923
Imperial Tsesarevich Easter Egg
1912
Lapis lazuli, gold, diamonds, platinum or silver
5.75 x 4 (diameter) in. (on stand) (14.61 x 10.16 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

The Imperial Tsesarevich Easter Egg, created by workmaster Henrik Wigström, has six lapis lazuli segments with doubleheaded eagles, winged caryatids, hanging canopies, scrolls, flower baskets, and sprays that conceal the joints. It is set with a large solitaire diamond at the base, and a table diamond (a thin, flat diamond) on top over the Cyrillic monogram AF (for Alexandra Feodorovna) and the date 1912. The surprise found inside is a portrait painted on ivory, front and back, of the tsesarevich in a diamond-set, double-headed eagle standing on a lapis lazuli pedestal. In addition to assisting Perkhin with 26 imperial eggs, Henrik Wigström produced 20 to 21 additional eggs between 1906 and 1916, including this masterpiece.

Henrik Immanuel Wigström (1862-1923) was one of the most important Fabergé workmasters along with Michael Perchin. Perchin was the head workmaster from 1886 until his death in 1903, when he was succeeded by his chief assistant Henrik Wigstrom. These two workmasters were responsible for almost all the imperial Easter eggs.

Once in Madsén’s employment, his master’s trade with Russia, as well as his numerous business contacts here, brought him to work in St. Petersburg. It is unknown who employed Wigström on his arrival in the capital, but Wigström became assistant in 1884, at the age of 22, to Perchin, whose shop at that time was already working exclusively for Fabergé. Wigström became head workmaster at Fabergé after Perchin’s death in 1903. The number of craftsmen in Wigström’s workshop diminished drastically with the outbreak of World War I. By 1918, the Revolution forced the complete closing of the House of Fabergé. Aged 56, Wigström retreated almost empty-handed to his summer house, on Finnish territory, and died there in 1923.

His art is similar to Perchin’s but tends to be in the Louis XVI, Empire, or neo-classical style. Nearly all the Fabergé hardstone animals, figures and flowers from that time period were produced under his supervision.

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Mikhail Perkhin, Workmaster Russian , 1860-1903
Johannes Zehngraf, Painter of miniatures Russian, 1857-1908
Imperial Pelican Easter Egg
1897
Gold, diamonds, enamel, pearls, watercolor on ivory
4 x 2.125 (diameter) in. (10.16 x 5.40 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Michael Evlampievich Perchin (Russian: Михаил Евлампьевич Перхин) (1860-1903) was born in Okulovskaya in Olonets Governorate (now Republic of Karelia) and died in St. Petersburg. He was one of the most important Fabergé workmasters along with Henrik Wigström. Perchin became the leading workmaster in the House of Fabergé in 1886 and supervised production of the eggs until his death in 1903. The eggs he was responsible for were marked with his initials.

He worked initially as a journeyman in the workshop of Erik August Kollin. In 1884 he qualified as a master craftsman and his artistic potential must have been obvious to Fabergé who appointed him head workmaster in 1886. His workshop produced all types of objets de fantasie in gold, enamel and hard stones. All the important commissions of the time, including some of the Imperial Easter Eggs, the renowned “Fabergé eggs”, were made in his workshop. His period as head Fabergé workmaster is generally acknowledged to be the most artistically innovative, with a huge range of styles from neo-Rococo to Renaissance.

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Mikhail Perkhin, Workmaster Russian , 1860-1903
Johannes Zehngraf, Painter of miniatures Russian , 1857-1908
Imperial Pelican Easter Egg (detail)
1897
Gold, diamonds, enamel, pearls, watercolor on ivory
4 x 2.125 (diameter) in. (10.16 x 5.40 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Johannes Zehngraf (born April 18, 1857 in Nykøbing Falster, Denmark † February 7, 1908 in Berlin) was a Danish painter of miniatures and chief miniaturist in the house of Carl Peter Fabergé in St. Petersburg. He was the son of painter and photographer Christian Antoni Zehngraf and Rebecca de Lemos and married on January 27, 1880 in Aalborg Caroline Ludovica Lund (* June 30, 1856 † after 1908), the daughter of Carl Ludvig Lund and Pouline Elisabeth Poulsen.

Zehngraf learned in Aalborg with his father the art of photography and worked at first as a photographer, later in Aarhus, Odense and Malmö (1886-1889). The small-scale retouching his photographs led him then to miniature painting. As a miniaturist he settled down in 1889 in Berlin and counted the European royal houses to its customers. He led the photographic realism with their richness of detail in his painting. Portraits of the Russian Emperor Alexander III., His wife, the Empress Maria Feodorovna, the Danish Princess Thyra and a series of portraits of eleven miniature effigies of the Danish King Christian IX family testify to his skill. He painted, among others, the thumbnails on the Lily of the Valley Faberge Egg (1898)

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Henrik Wigström, Workmaster Russian, 1862-1923
Imperial Red Cross Easter Egg with Portraits
1915
Silver, enamel, gold, mother-of-pearl, watercolor on ivory, velvet lining
3 x 2.375 (diameter) in. (7.62 x 6.03 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Henrik Wigström, Workmaster Russian, 1862-1923
Imperial Red Cross Easter Egg with Portraits (detail)
1915
Silver, enamel, gold, mother-of-pearl, watercolor on ivory, velvet lining
3 x 2.375 (diameter) in. (7.62 x 6.03 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Ring Box
before 1899
Gold, ruby, silk
1 (height) in. (2.54 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Rooster
c. 1900
Carnelian, diamonds, gold
1.5 x 0.5 x 1.25 in. (3.81 x 1.27 x 3.18 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Rooster (detail)
c. 1900
Carnelian, diamonds, gold
1.5 x 0.5 x 1.25 in. (3.81 x 1.27 x 3.18 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Katherine Wetzel
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Miniature Easter Egg Pendant
c. 1900
Gold, enamel, diamonds, sapphires
0.75 (height) x 0.5 (diameter) in. (1.91 x 1.27 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Miniature Easter Egg Pendant
c. 1900
Chalcedony, gold, diamonds
1.35 x 0.875 (diameter) in. (3.18 x 2.22 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Parasol Handle
before 1899
Bowenite, gold, diamonds, pearls, enamel
3¼ H x 1½ W (8.26 cm x 3.81 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Parasol Handle (detail)
before 1899
Bowenite, gold, diamonds, pearls, enamel
3¼ H x 1½ W (8.26 cm x 3.81 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

The tapering, pentagonal parasol handle has panels of pink guilloché enamel painted with dendritic motifs within opaque-white enamel borders. A diamond is centered on each panel and Louis XVI-style floral decorations are set between the panels. Atop the handle is a brilliant-cut diamond finial in a rose-cut diamond surround with diamond-set fillets.

Marks : Early initials of workmaster Mikhail Perkhin, assay mark of St. Petersburg before 1899, 56 zolotnik

Peter Karl Fabergé (Russian, 1846-1920)
Statuette of a Sailor
c. 1900
Agate, obsidian, aventurine quartz, lapis lazuli, sapphire
4.625 x 2.5 in. (11.75 x 6.35 cm)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Fedor Rückert (Russian, 1840-1917)
Loving Cup
1899-1908
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Jerome and Rita Gans Collection of Silver
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Fedor Rückert (Russian, 1840-1917)
Loving Cup
1899-1908
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Jerome and Rita Gans Collection of Silver
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Fedor Rückert (Russian, 1840-1917)
Loving Cup (detail)
1899-1908
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Jerome and Rita Gans Collection of Silver
Photo: Travis Fullerton
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Oklahoma City Museum of Art
415 Couch Drive
Oklahoma City, OK 73102

Opening hours:
Tuesday – Saturday: 10 am – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 am – 9 pm
Sunday: noon – 5 pm
Closed: Monday and Major Holidays


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Faberge Imperial Collection for sale eBay

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Jewels, Eggs and Empires: The Story Of Forbes And Faberge

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  • He purchased the finest eggs--the Coronation and the Lilies of the Valley--for roughly $2 million combined (about $6.5 million today)

How Joan Rivers collected Fabergé Christie's

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  • In terms of rarity and importance, the collection is led by a jewelled, gold-mounted Fabergé lily of the valley leaf (above)
  • It relates to a number of lily of the valley studies by Fabergé with imperial provenance, but is apparently one of only two extant examples of a leaf study, the other being in the Geddings Gray Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Fabergé Research Site Eggs

  • Description: “Easter Egg of white enamel egg, the crown is set with rubies, diamonds and rose diamonds-4,151 rubles (including 2 ruby eggs-2,700 rubles)” appears in a handwritten list of the Imperial Easter eggs from 1885 to 1890 made by N
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The Mysterious Fate of the Romanov Family's Prized Easter

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  • The Faberge Hen Egg, part of 'Imperial Treasures: Faberge from the Forbes Collection' at Sotheby's auction house in New York, 2004
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Romanov Tercentenary (Fabergé egg)

  • In 1917, the Romanov Tercentenary Egg was confiscated by the Provisional Government during the Russian Revolution, along with many other Imperial treasures
  • It was transported from the Anichkov Palace to the Kremlin Armoury, Moscow, where it remained
  • The Romanov Tercentenary Egg is one of ten Faberge Eggs in the collection at the Kremlin Armoury.

Luxury Russian Faberge Egg Imperial Christmas Ornaments

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  • BestPysanky’s Royal Collection of imperial eggs, ornaments, egg pendant necklaces, royal picture frames, and jewelry boxes are mostly inspired by the glorious Russian royal family’s era
  • Carefully selected colors and elaborate designs create a luxurious look in every product, truly the Royal Collection is a trove of exquisite work of art.

Kremlin Armoury: The World of Amazing Faberge Kremlin Tour

  • Imperial Faberge Eggs of Moscow Kremlin
  • The Armoury’s unique collection include: Egg with a model of the 'Memory of the Azov' Cruiser
  • It was a present from Emperor Alexander III to Empress Maria Fyodorovna
  • The heliotrope egg consists of two parts
  • The dark green heliotrope is decorated with diamond-studded gold scrolls

The missing Faberge egg turned up by a scrap metal dealer

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The egg was thought to have been lost after the Soviets listed it for sale in 1922 as part of a policy of turning "treasures into tractors," but in 2011, Faberge researchers recognized it in a

Where to See the Fabled Fabergé Imperial Easter Eggs

For example, the Hen Egg is now part of the Vekselberg Collection (named for Russian oil and metal mogul Viktor Vekselberg, who purchased nine eggs from the Forbes family in …

Faberge egg replica products for sale eBay

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  • Get the best deals on faberge egg replica when you shop the largest online selection at eBay.com
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  • Royal Imperial Pink Faberge Egg Replica: Extra Large 6.6” with Faberge carriage

Imperial egg Collection Faberge style Egg Antique CLOCK

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1996 VINTAGE EGG Gold egg FABERGE style CLOCK / Imperial egg Faberge style egg /Faberge wedding egg style White /Faberge white egg jewel box egg/ PERFECT WEDDING or engagement PROPOSAL ring box EGG! FREE DELIVERY OR TNT EXPRESS DELIVERY option available ITEM DETAILS -Handmade in 1996 -24k gold

Where to See the Last Imperial Fabergé Eggs Around the World

  • The Kremlin Armory in Moscow holds the largest collection of imperial Fabergé eggs in the world
  • House of Fabergé was commissioned to craft imperial Easter eggs for the royal family for 11 Easters, and in that time, constructed some of history’s finest, most valuable works of objet d’art.The Kremlin’s collection of 10 imperial eggs includes the Moscow Kremlin Egg, a gold and silver

Fabergé and Russian Decorative Arts

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  • 360° Views of VMFA’s Imperial Eggs Fabergé’s greatest triumph was the series of fifty-two unique Easter eggs made for the last tsars of Russia
  • Inspired by the traditional Russian custom of giving decorated eggs at Easter, Tsar Alexander III commissioned the first Imperial Easter egg in 1885 as a gift for his wife, Empress Maria Feodorovna.

House of Carl Fabergé Imperial Napoleonic Egg Russian

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  • Imperial Napoleonic Egg 1912 Upon her death, her collection passed to the foundation she had established in 1969, with the express wish that a broad public should be able to enjoy it
  • [Wolfram Koeppe, 2011] Marking: on the metal: 1) FABERGE', in Cyrillic 2) 56, gold carat mark 3) H.W., workmaster's mark 4) Kokoshnik head

Faberge Eggs, Shop Russian Royal Imperial Faberge Easter

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  • Russian Royal Imperial Fabergé Easter Eggs for Sale
  • Russian Jeweled Collection Collectible Expensive Egg Jewelry Replica Copy

The History of the Romanovs Faberge Easter Egg Collection

Three Imperial Faberge eggs from left to right: The Cuckoo Clock, the Lily of the Valley (with photographs of Tsar Nicholas II and his two oldest …

Vodka Imperial Collection Super Premium. Faberge eggs

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The Fabergé Egg: From Imperial Russia to Global Treasure Hunts

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  • Ten of the imperial Easter eggs are now displayed at Moscow's Kremlin Armory Museum, while others belong to museums and private collections around the world
  • In 1927, Joseph Stalin sold many of the eggs to buyers outside of Russia
  • The second largest collection of Fabergé eggs belonged to Malcolm Forbes and was displayed in New York City.

360° Views of VMFA’s Imperial Eggs – The Lillian Thomas

  • Fabergé’s greatest triumph was the series of fifty-two unique Easter eggs made for the last tsars of Russia
  • Inspired by the traditional Russian custom of giving decorated eggs at Easter, Tsar Alexander III commissioned the first Imperial Easter egg in 1885 as a gift for his wife, Empress Maria Feodorovna.

Fabergé Rediscovered Hillwood Estate, Museum and Garden

  • Treasures created by the firm of Peter Carl Fabergé (1846-1920) have inspired admiration and intrigue for over a century, both for their remarkable craftsmanship and the fascinating histories that surround them
  • Featuring over 100 objects, Fabergé Rediscovered will unveil new discoveries relating to Hillwood’s own collection of Fabergé imperial Easter eggs and other famed works

The $300 Million Hunt For 7 Lost Fabergé Easter Eggs

  • Imperial Fabergé eggs are the ultimate prize again
  • They are the target for buyers wanting to reflect their riches
  • They have come full circle and are symbols of wealth and power once more.” In 2004, Russian oil and gas tycoon Viktor Vekselberg paid “just” $100 million for a US tycoon’s nine imperial eggs

Take a look at Fabergé’s Easter Eggs – extraordinary

Probably best known for the exquisite Easter eggs that he crafted for the Russian Imperial house of Romanov, Peter Carl Fabergé was Russia’s premier …


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