The story

Has the lost Biblical town of Dalmanutha been found?

Has the lost Biblical town of Dalmanutha been found?


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Today we reported on the discovery of a 2,000-year-old mansion at Jerusalem’s Mount Zion, which is believed to have belonged to a member of the Sadducees class, whom Jesus criticised for their wealth. Now, in another significant discovery, the same archaeological team believe they have found the lost Biblical town of Dalmanutha where Jesus is thought to have stayed following the feeding of the 5,000 miracle.

The town was uncovered in Israel’s Ginosar Valley on the northwest coast of the Sea of Galilee, which is described in the Gospel of Mark as the location of Jesus’ next journey after the miracle of the feeding of the 5,000 where he is said to have fed a large group of people with less than seven loaves of bread and two fish.

Archaeologists found pottery remains, vessel glasses, and Roman column fragments indicating a town flourished in the area of what is now the modern-day town of Migdal (Magdala). A 2,000-year-old boat found in 1986 on a nearby shoreline also supports the view that the town was once a prosperous fishing hub.

“Stone anchors along with the access to beaches suitable for landing boats and of course, the first-century boat… all imply an involvement with fishing,” said Ken Dark, of the University of Reading, who led the archaeological team.

The town is only mentioned once in the Gospel of Mark, which states that after feeding 5,000 people Jesus sailed to Dalmanutha, where he was questioned by the Pharisees and asked to provide a sign from heaven.

Dalmanutha is also thought to be the home town of Mary Magdalene.


    Biblical-Era Town Discovered Along Sea of Galilee

    A town dating back more than 2,000 years has been discovered on the northwest coast of the Sea of Galilee, in Israel's Ginosar valley.

    The ancient town may be Dalmanutha (also spelled Dalmanoutha), described in the Gospel of Mark as the place Jesus sailed to after miraculously feeding 4,000 people by multiplying a few fish and loaves of bread, said Ken Dark, of the University of Reading in the U.K., whose team discovered the town during a field survey.

    The archaeologists also determined that a famous boat, dating to around 2,000 years ago, and uncovered in 1986, was found on the shoreline of the newly discovered town. The boat was reported on two decades ago but the discovery of the town provides new information on what lay close to it.

    The evidence the team found suggests the town was prosperous in ancient times. "Vessel glass and amphora hint at wealth," Dark wrote in an article published in the most recent edition of the journal Palestine Exploration Quarterly, while "weights and stone anchors, along with the access to beaches suitable for landing boats — and, of course, the first-century boat … all imply an involvement with fishing." [ Photos: 4,000-Year-Old Structure Hidden Under Sea of Galilee ]

    The architectural remains and pottery suggest that Jews and those following a polytheistic religion lived side by side in the community. In addition, the researchers found that the southern side of the newly discovered town lies only about 500 feet (150 meters) away from another ancient town known as Magdala.

    Architecture and pottery

    Fields between the modern-day town of Migdal and the sea coast contained hundreds of pottery pieces dating from as early as the second or first century B.C. to up to some point after the fifth century A.D., the time of the Byzantine Empire, the archaeologists found. The artifacts suggest the town survived for many centuries.

    Also among their finds were cubes known as tesserae and limestone vessel fragments, which were "associated with Jewish purity practices in the early Roman period," indicating the presence of a Jewish community in the town, Dark told LiveScience in an email.

    Some of the most impressive finds, however, were not made in the fields but rather in modern-day Migdal itself. The archaeologists found dozens of examples of ancient architectural remains, some of which the modern-day townspeople had turned into seats or garden ornaments, or simply left lying on the ground. In one instance, the researchers found more than 40 basalt ashlar blocks in a single garden.

    After talking to the local people, and trying to identify the source and date of the findings, the researchers determined that many of the architectural remains came from the local area and likely were part of this newly discovered town. [ Photos: Amazing Ruins of the Ancient World ]

    These remains included a number of ancient column fragments, including examples of capitals (the top of columns) carved in a Corinthian style. "This settlement may have contained masonry buildings, some with mosaic floors and architectural stonework," Dark wrote in his paper.

    The finds also included a pagan altar, made of light-gray limestone and used in religious rituals by those of a polytheistic faith, Dark said.

    Is it Dalmanutha?

    In the New Testament, Dalmanutha is mentioned only briefly in the Gospel of Mark.

    The gospel says that after feeding 4,000 people by miraculously multiplying a few fish and loaves of bread, Jesus "got into the boat with his disciples and went to the region of Dalmanutha. The Pharisees came and began to question Jesus. To test him, they asked him for a sign from heaven. He sighed deeply and said, 'Why does this generation ask for a sign? Truly I tell you, no sign will be given to it.'Then he left them, got back into the boat and crossed to the other side." (Mark 8:10-13, New International Version)

    Dark isn't certain the newly discovered town is Dalmanutha, but there is evidence to support the idea. From the remains found, researchers can tell the newly discovered town would have been a sizable, thriving location in the first century A.D., and the name Dalmanutha has not been firmly linked to a known archaeological site.

    It's likely that the newly found town's name is among the few place-names already identified by other researchers relating to the Ginosar valley shore, and one of those places is Dalmanutha, Dark said.


    Right Place

    In order to identify the site of the ancient city of Ai from Joshua’s day a number of biblical criteria need to be met relating to geography and topography:

    1. Be adjacent to Beth Aven (Josh. 7:2)
    2. Be East of and near to Bethel (Josh. 7:2 12:9)
    3. Have an ambush site between Bethel and Ai (Josh. 8:9, 12)
    4. Have a militarily significant hill north of Ai where the Israealite army camped (Josh. 8:11)
    5. Be close to a shallow valley north where Joshua and the decoy force could be seen by the king of Ai (Josh. 8:13–14)

    The late Dr. David Livingston identified Bethel as modern el-Bireh. Building on his work, archaeologist Dr. Bryant Wood convincingly argued Bethel is indeed modern el-Bireh and Beth-Aven is modern Beitin and that only Khirbet el-Maqatir satisfies all of the above criteria. 5 Geographically, it lies due east of Bethel/el-Bireh and only 1 mile southeast of Beth Aven/Beitin.

    Khirbet el-Maqatir shown in relation to Bethel (el-Bireh) and Beth Aven (Beitin). Credit: Associates for Biblical Research (BibleArchaeology.org)

    Today, one can see how the battle unfolded by looking at the topography around Khirbet el-Maqatir. North of the site is the highest hill in the region, called Jebel Abu Ammar, where Joshua’s main force encamped. Between it and Khirbet el-Maqatir is a shallow valley where the King of Ai could see the Israelite decoy force coming to battle. Immediately west of the site is the steep valley of the Wadi Sheban in which Joshua’s ambush force hid.

    Khirbet el-Maqatir and the Wadi Sheban (the spot where Joshua’s ambush force likely hid) Photo Credit: Todd Bolen – bibleplaces.com labeled by the author with help from Gary Byers


    Biblical Town of Dalmanutha Found by Archaeologists on Sea of Galilee?

    Archaeologists have discovered a 2,000-year-old town off the coast of the Sea of Galilee which may be the place Jesus sailed to after feeding thousands of his followers.

    In the New Testament, Dalmanutha is named as the place where Jesus sailed to after the miracle of the loaves and fishes.

    The ancient town was discovered on the northwest coast of the Sea of Galilee in Israel's Ginosar valley by a team from the University of Reading.

    The archaeologists also confirmed that a 2,000-year-old boat had been uncovered in 1986 on the outskirts of the latest dig. The vessel was nicknamed the "Jesus Boat" although no evidence has been produced linking it to Christ.

    The name Dalmanutha, which the archaeologists believe was a fishing town, has not been linked to any other known archaeological site.

    Ken Dark, of the University of Reading, said: "Weights and stone anchors, along with the access to beaches suitable for landing boats - and, of course, the first-century boat - all imply an involvement with fishing."

    The architectural remains and pottery suggest that Jews and a polytheistic religion lived together in the town, according to (http://www.livescience.com/http://) Live Science website.

    The town of Dalmanutha is only mentioned once in the Bible, during verses 8:8-8:10 of the Book of Mark.

    The passage reads: "So they did eat, and were filled: and they took up of the broken meat that was left in seven baskets.

    "And they that had eaten were about four thousand: and he sent them away.

    "And straightway he entered into a ship with his disciples, and came into the parts of Dalmanutha."

    The town is only 500ft (150m) away from the ancient town of Migdal, which has been widely identified as Magdala, the birth place of Mary Magdalene.


    2,000+ Year-Old ‘Biblical’ Town Discovered

    Archaeologist Dr. Ken Dark of the University of Reading (Berkshire, England) and a team currently in the midst of a field survey study, have claimed to have potentially discovered the location of an ancient city known as Dalmanutha in modern day Israel. Dark and his team have managed to unearth artifacts leading to this assertion in a location slightly north of the present-day city of Tiberias, Israel. The primary bulk of evidence has been collected on the northwest coast of the Sea of Galilee in what is known as the Ginosar valley (Israel).

    The discovery is not quite set in stone (so to speak), and the claim is still under scrutiny among those familiar with the area and the history of this alleged biblical city. Although the current findings can only be deemed speculative, the mass of data recorded by the team has many people asking if this could indeed be the location of the archaic township they are presenting it as. To date, Dalmanutha has yet to have any objective link to a specific location making Dark’s contention completely plausible. Many who have commented about the find have stated that it is unlikely that this hypothesis will ever be validated as fact. Regardless of whether or not anyone will ever be able to prove that this was the site of the city, the items the team have presented are said to be over 2,000 years old.

    Throughout history Dalmanutha was a city who’s existence was only truly discussed in the Bible. Dalmanutha is mentioned in a few verses throughout the New Testament as the city Jesus sailed to after “feeding the five thousand people” (by performing the miracle of multiplying fish and bread – the only “miracle” described in all four gospels). The city is mentioned in both the Gospel of Matthew and of Mark. In both instances of scripture, Dalmanutha is implied as a naval/port community which is what directed Dr. Dark and his team to think that this was in fact it’s location.

    The artifacts found at the site included: pottery remains, tiles, weights, and stone anchors – insinuating that the location was pretty certainly a fishing/boating based district. In addition to supporting the naval theories, the pottery items found suggest that throughout history, the location was probably home to Jewish people and others who may have held polytheistic beliefs, both coexisting at the same time periods.

    These items were said to have “clearly” been from a thriving economical area around the 1st century A.D. Dark and his team found samples of “vessel glass and amphora”, both entities commonly associated with a prosperous region. Dr. Dark, who obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge in England, stated, “the vessel glass and amphora hint at wealth.” Dark continued to mention more of his findings in his article recently published in the Palestine Exploration Quarterly Journal, “Weights and stone anchors, along with the access to beaches suitable for landing boats – and, of course, the first-century boat.”

    Biblically speaking, Dalmanutha is associated with the vicinity of Magdala according to scripture. Magdala, or Magadan, is allegedly said to have been the home and birthplace of Mary Magdalene. Matthew 15:39 speaks of Jesus’ departure to Magadan (more specifically the city of Dalmanutha): “After Jesus had sent the crowd away, he got into the boat and went to the vicinity of Magadan.” It is again, later discussed in Mark 8-10, “he got into the boat with his disciples and went to the region of Dalmanutha.”


    Biblical-Era Town Discovered Along Sea of Galilee

    A town dating back more than 2,000 years has been discovered on the northwest coast of the Sea of Galilee, in Israel's Ginosar valley.

    The ancient town may be Dalmanutha (also spelled Dalmanoutha), described in the Gospel of Mark as the place Jesus sailed to after miraculously feeding 4,000 people by multiplying a few fish and loaves of bread, said Ken Dark, of the University of Reading in the U.K., whose team discovered the town during a field survey.

    The archaeologists also determined that a famous boat, dating to around 2,000 years ago, and uncovered in 1986, was found on the shoreline of the newly discovered town. The boat was reported on two decades ago but the discovery of the town provides new information on what lay close to it.

    The evidence the team found suggests the town was prosperous in ancient times. "Vessel glass and amphora hint at wealth," Dark wrote in an article published in the most recent edition of the journal Palestine Exploration Quarterly, while "weights and stone anchors, along with the access to beaches suitable for landing boats — and, of course, the first-century boat … all imply an involvement with fishing." [Photos: 4,000-Year-Old Structure Hidden Under Sea of Galilee]

    The architectural remains and pottery suggest that Jews and those following a polytheistic religion lived side by side in the community. In addition, the researchers found that the southern side of the newly discovered town lies only about 500 feet (150 meters) away from another ancient town known as Magdala.

    Architecture and pottery

    Fields between the modern-day town of Migdal and the sea coast contained hundreds of pottery pieces dating from as early as the second or first century B.C. to up to some point after the fifth century A.D., the time of the Byzantine Empire, the archaeologists found. The artifacts suggest the town survived for many centuries.

    Also among their finds were cubes known as tesserae and limestone vessel fragments, which were "associated with Jewish purity practices in the early Roman period," indicating the presence of a Jewish community in the town, Dark told LiveScience in an email.

    Some of the most impressive finds, however, were not made in the fields but rather in modern-day Migdal itself. The archaeologists found dozens of examples of ancient architectural remains, some of which the modern-day townspeople had turned into seats or garden ornaments, or simply left lying on the ground. In one instance, the researchers found more than 40 basalt ashlar blocks in a single garden.

    After talking to the local people, and trying to identify the source and date of the findings, the researchers determined that many of the architectural remains came from the local area and likely were part of this newly discovered town. [Photos: Amazing Ruins of the Ancient World]

    These remains included a number of ancient column fragments, including examples of capitals (the top of columns) carved in a Corinthian style. "This settlement may have contained masonry buildings, some with mosaic floors and architectural stonework," Dark wrote in his paper.

    The finds also included a pagan altar, made of light-gray limestone and used in religious rituals by those of a polytheistic faith, Dark said.

    Is it Dalmanutha?

    In the New Testament, Dalmanutha is mentioned only briefly in the Gospel of Mark.

    The gospel says that after feeding 4,000 people by miraculously multiplying a few fish and loaves of bread, Jesus "got into the boat with his disciples and went to the region of Dalmanutha. The Pharisees came and began to question Jesus. To test him, they asked him for a sign from heaven. He sighed deeply and said, 'Why does this generation ask for a sign? Truly I tell you, no sign will be given to it.'Then he left them, got back into the boat and crossed to the other side." (Mark 8:10-13, New International Version)

    Dark isn't certain the newly discovered town is Dalmanutha, but there is evidence to support the idea. From the remains found, researchers can tell the newly discovered town would have been a sizable, thriving location in the first century A.D., and the name Dalmanutha has not been firmly linked to a known archaeological site.

    It's likely that the newly found town's name is among the few place-names already identified by other researchers relating to the Ginosar valley shore, and one of those places is Dalmanutha, Dark said.

    Copyright 2013 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


    Town named in Bible may have been found

    Sometimes, archaeologists discover a sweater other times, they uncover entire towns. The latter turns out to be the case in Israel, where a town has been found — and it could be one mentioned in a well-known Bible story. LiveScience reports that it was found along the northwest side of the Sea of Galilee, and British archaeologists suggest that it is Dalmanutha, a place that factors into the Gospel of Mark's recounting of Jesus feeding a great crowd of people with just a few fish and loaves of bread: Dalmanutha is where he briefly sailed after that miracle.

    The archaeologists made their discovery during a field survey, and team lead Ken Dark theorizes it is indeed Dalmanutha, and one reason he gives is that artifacts collected there indicate it was an active city at the start of the Common Era. In a June lecture Dark gave at the University of Edinburgh, he further explained his thought process, as summarized on the blog of the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins: "It is hard to imagine that a Roman-period coastal community of this size is nowhere mentioned in textual sources, and the site might be identified with one of the unlocated toponyms known from the Bible, perhaps the Dalmanutha of Mark 8:10." (In other news in the region, archaeologists recently found a treasure trove in Jerusalem.)

    Newser is a USA TODAY content partner providing general news, commentary and coverage from around the Web. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.


    Dalmanutha, Biblical Town Mentioned In Gospel Of Mark, Possibly Discovered Archaeologists Claim

    Dalmanutha, a Biblical town described in the Gospel of Mark as the place where Jesus sailed after miraculously multiplying a few loaves and fish to feed 4,000 people, may have just been discovered by archaeologists, reports LiveScience.

    So they did eat, and were filled: and they took up of the broken meat that was left seven baskets.

    And they that had eaten were about four thousand: and he sent them away.

    And straightway he entered into a ship with his disciples, and came into the parts of Dalmanutha.

    -Mark 8:8-8:10, King James Version

    Dalmanutha is only mentioned in Mark's Gospel, but the corresponding passage in Matthew 15:39 says, "And he sent away the multitude, and took ship, and came into the coasts of Magdala," which has been identified with some certainty as the modern-day town of Migdal, located slightly inland near Israel's Ginosar Valley. Magdala is perhaps most well-known for its association with Mary Magdalene, or Mary of Magdala, who may have been born in the town.

    Fields between today's Migdal and the coast are rich with archaeological discoveries, reports Ken Dark of the U.K.'s University of Reading, whose team discovered the town they are proposing is Dalmanutha while conducting a field survey. They have linked it with the 1986 discovery of a 2,000-year-old boat which was found on the shoreline, and to date is the most famous artifact associated with the specific area.

    "Vessel glass and amphora hint at wealth," wrote Dark in the most recent edition of Palestine Exploration Quarterly, and "eights and stone anchors, along with the access to beaches suitable for landing boats — and, of course, the first-century boat … all imply an involvement with fishing."

    The findings indicate that the town was prosperous and likely survived for centuries, as the pottery pieces date from as early as the second or first century BCE to around fifth century CE, the time of the Byzantine Empire. A Jewish community likely lived alongside a polytheistic one as tesserae cubes and limestone vessel fragments, "associated with Jewish purity practices in the early Roman period" have been found, Dark told LiveScience.

    Modern-day Migdal has also been a cornucopia of ancient finds, some of which were discovered out in the open, repurposed by the current residents. Some architectural remains had been turned into seats or garden ornaments, and over 40 basalt ashlar blocks were found in a single garden.

    Though Dark is not certain that the newly uncovered town is the Biblical Dalmanutha, the size of the town supports that identification. Dalmanutha is one of a few place-names known by researchers to relate to the Ginosar Valley shore, that is not already linked to an archaeological site.


    Dalmanutha

    a place on the west of the Sea of Galilee, mentioned only in Mark 8:10 . In the parallel passage it is said that Christ came "into the borders of Magdala" ( Matthew 15:39 ). It is plain, then, that Dalmanutha was near Magdala, which was probably the Greek name of one of the many Migdols (i.e., watch-towers) on the western side of the lake of Gennesaret. It has been identified in the ruins of a village about a mile from Magdala, in the little open valley of 'Ain-el-Barideh, "the cold fountain," called el-Mejdel, possibly the "Migdal-el" of Joshua 19:38 .

    These dictionary topics are from
    M.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,
    published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely. [N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible
    [H] indicates this entry was also found in Hitchcock's Bible Names
    [S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible Dictionary
    Bibliography Information

    Easton, Matthew George. "Entry for Dalmanutha". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". .

    Hitchcock, Roswell D. "Entry for 'Dalmanutha'". "An Interpreting Dictionary of Scripture Proper Names". . New York, N.Y., 1869.

    a town on the west side of the Sea of Galilee, near Magdala. ( Matthew 15:39 ) and Mark 8:10 [ MAGDALA ] Dalmnnutha probably stood at the place called Ain-el-Barideh , "the cold fountain." [N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible
    [E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary
    [H] indicates this entry was also found in Hitchcock's Bible Names
    Bibliography Information

    Smith, William, Dr. "Entry for 'Dalmanutha'". "Smith's Bible Dictionary". . 1901.


    Dalmanutha: Archaeologists May Have Found Biblical Town

    Archaeologists led by Dr Ken Dark from the University of Reading’s Research Center for Late Antique and Byzantine Studies, UK, have discovered what they believe could be the remains of Dalmanutha, a Biblical town on the shores of the Sea of Galilee mentioned in the Gospel of Mark as the destination of Jesus after he fed 4,000 people with a few fish and a few loaves of bread.

    A general view of part of the survey area, looking southwest, showing the mountains bounding the Ginosar valley. Image credit: Dr Ken Dark / © The Palestine Exploration Fund / Maney Publishing, www.maneypublishing.com.

    Dr Dark’s team found a number of Late Hellenistic, Roman-period and Byzantine artifacts during an archaeological survey carried out in 2012 in the Ginosar valley, Israel.

    The archaeologists found thousands of sherds of Roman-period pottery fragments of Byzantine period red-slipped wares, ribbed cooking pots and amphorae vessel glass shards stone artifacts, including early Roman-period limestone vessel fragments many stone and ceramic tesserae.

    They also recorded an extensive spread of ancient architectural fragments in the adjacent, modern city of Migdal.

    “Fragments of Roman-period and Byzantine architectural stonework and agricultural objects are scattered throughout the town, where they are visible just by walking around the streets of this open-plan settlement,” Dr Dark wrote in a paper published in the journal Palestine Exploration Quarterly (www.maneypublishing.com/journals/peq or www.ingentaconnect.com/content/maney/peq).

    “Several local people told us artifacts had indeed been found in casual earthmoving and then used in garden contexts.”

    “The recorded data suggest a large Late Hellenistic to Byzantine-period settlement extending from the hilltop on which Migdal stands today, across the fields to the shore to its east.”

    According to Dr Dark, the settlement may have contained masonry buildings, some with mosaic floors and architectural stonework.

    “The presence of both limestone vessel fragments and a pagan altar, suggest an Early Roman-period community of Jews and non-Jews, while the possible holy water stoup suggests the presence of Christians in the Byzantine period.”

    “Vessel glass and amphora hint at wealth, while olive-presses – assuming that at least some of those recorded in Migdal are genuinely from this settlement, mortars and querns suggest an involvement with agriculture,” Dr Dark explained.

    “Weights and stone anchors, along with the access to beaches suitable for landing boats, and of course the first-century boat found there in 1986, all imply an involvement with fishing.”

    Bibliographic information: Dark KR. Archaeological evidence for a previously unrecognised Roman town near the Sea of Galilee. Palestine Exploration Quarterly, vol. 145, no. 3, pp. 185-202 doi: 10.1179/0031032813Z.00000000057


    Watch the video: 01 Introduction. The Land of the Bible: Location u0026 Land Bridge (June 2022).


    Comments:

    1. Abu Bakr

      Quite right! I think this is a great idea.

    2. Gallagher

      I'm sorry, but I think you are wrong. Email me at PM, we'll talk.

    3. Andret

      Competent :) message, it's entertaining ...

    4. Cleit

      This phrase is simply incomparable :), I really like it)))



    Write a message