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Goldcrest II LCI - History

Goldcrest II LCI - History


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Goldcrest II

(LCI(L)-869: dp. 209; 1. 159'; b. 24'; dr. 5'8"; #. 14 k.;
epl. 21; a. 5 20mm.; cl. LCI (L)351)

LCI(L)-869 was laid down by the New Jersey S. B. Corp., Barber, N.J., 31 August 1944; launched 29 September 1944; and commissioned 7 October 1944, Lt. (j.g.) J. C. Smith in command.

With shakedown in Chesapeake Bay, the new large infantry landing craft departed Key West, Fla., 12 November for the Pacific, transited the Panama Canal on the 19th, and arrived San Diego 1 December. There she joined LCI Group 57, sailed for Hawaii 29 January 1945, and arrived Pearl Harbor 7 February.

LCI (L)-86'9 got underway for the war zone on the 15th, refueled at Johnston Island 5 days later, and reached the Palaus, via Majuro, Kwajalein, Eniwetok, and Guam, 7 April. There she joined a picket line which had been formed to seal off by-passed Japanese-held islands in the area from reinforcements and to protect American bases from invasion. While on picket station, LCI(U)869 repulsed a suicide swimming attack, sank several floating mines which threatened American ships, and heard countless mortar shells whine overhead.

On the afternoon of 2 September, the Japanese forces in the Palaus surrendered. With her mission accomplished, LCI (L)-869 returned to the United States, decommissioned at Norfolk in March 1947, and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

The landing craft was named Goldcrest and redesignated AMc(U)-24 on 7 March 1952. Goldcrest was converted at the Charleston Navy Yard, assigned to the 6th Naval District, and operated out of Key West, Fla. She decommissioned at Charleston in March 1955 and reentered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Charleston. There she was reclassified a coastal minehunter and redesignated MHC-24. Goldcrest was struck from the Navy List 1 January 1960 and scrapped.


Levine Cancer Institute Expansion Increases Services for Region's Cancer Patients

CHARLOTTE, N.C., April 22, 2019 &ndash Atrium Health&rsquos Levine Cancer Institute opened the newest addition to the world-renowned cancer institute: Levine Cancer Institute II (LCI II). This new facility is an extension of the research and academic headquarters in Charlotte and will enhance cancer and hematologic services throughout communities in North Carolina and South Carolina.

The $125 million, 260,000 square-foot building will provide development in several areas of cancer care, including elevated research efforts around innovative treatments, survivorship support programs, palliative care and patient rehabilitation. Additional areas for support include expanded hematologic, thoracic, and gastrointestinal oncology capabilities, a larger pharmacy and infusion area.

By establishing its network on a unique combination of national and regional initiatives to remove obstacles to care, Levine Cancer Institute has become one of the largest cancer programs in the nation, serving more than 17,000 new patients at more than 25 care locations. Due to the institute&rsquos unique care model and innovative approaches including virtual tumor boards, proprietary electronically accessible pathways and focus on research and leading-edge treatment, patients in the region have unprecedented access to clinical trials and community-based care such as the nation&rsquos first mobile CT unit.

&ldquoWhen Levine Cancer Institute was established in 2010, our mission was to make world class cancer care available to all &ndash no matter where they live,&rdquo said Derek Raghavan, MD, PhD, president of Levine Cancer Institute. &ldquoToday, we are ensuring that many people, who before had little to no access to care, are getting the best possible treatment. With our newly expanded space, we can continue to build on our efforts to create the most advanced therapies and supportive services for patients and their families not just in Charlotte, but for all the communities we serve.&rdquo

The expanded space allows for:

  • More research and innovation. LCI II includes nearly 31,000 square feet dedicated to research which will allow for centralized oncology and hematology research as Levine Cancer Institute continues to invest in the development of clinical trials and other research to make it easier and more convenient for patients to access to groundbreaking therapies.
  • More efficient care. With centralized and streamlined nurse and physician stations, Levine Cancer Institute has enhanced its collaborative, interdisciplinary approach to care.
  • More support. With the new building comes the opportunity to expand the medical care teams, and

care providers across all disciplines are being added to the Levine Cancer Institute team, which already includes many national leaders in cancer treatment and care.

As part of the design process, the Institute&rsquos Patient and Family Advisory Council was involved in many key decisions about the building&rsquos design and flow. Based on their feedback, LCI II prominently features a chapel as well as a centralized lab and registration process for the entire headquarters. Also, all the infusion isolation bays feature windows and views of the rooftop garden, allowing for natural light and a better patient experience, which aligns to LCI&rsquos achievement as the world&rsquos first cancer network designated as a Planetree Patient-Centered Organization.

The creation of LCI II was supported by a $25 million commitment from the Leon Levine Foundation. Additional areas of support from the gift include:

  • $5 million to enhance operations at LCI, including a 21,000-square-foot renovation.
  • $20 million in inpatient renovations at Carolinas Medical Center, including a new 32-bed hematologic unit and renovations to an existing 32,000-square-foot space.
  • $125 million to build LCI II, which adds 260,000 square feet to the flagship facility.

&ldquoWe believe healthcare investments have the power to build thriving and successful communities for generations to come,&rdquo said Tom Lawrence, Executive Director of The Leon Levine Foundation. &ldquoWe&rsquore excited to celebrate the opening of LCI II, which will undoubtedly make a significant impact on the lives of so many.&rdquo

Levine Cancer Institute and Levine Cancer Institute II share an address &ndash 1021 Morehead Medical Drive, Charlotte, NC 28204 &ndash and are connected by an above-ground walkway.


Ships of the U.S. Navy, 1940-1945

  • Displacement: 387 tons (full load)
  • Length: 160'4"
  • Beam: 23'3"
  • Draft: Landing: 2'10" forward, 5'3" aft (LCI(G)-1--350) 2'8" forward, 5' aft (LCI(G)-351 & above)
  • Speed: 15.5 knots
  • Armament: 2-3 40mm, 3-4 20mm, 6 .50 cal, 10 Mk 7 & 2 Mk 22 rocket launchers
  • Complement: 5 officers, 65 enlisted
  • 8 GM diesels, twin screws
  • Converted from Landing Craft, Infantry (Large) -- LCI(L) for close-in fire support of landing operations

LCI(L) -- Landing Craft, Infantry (Large)

LCI(L)-1 Class

  • Displacement: 387 tons (full load)
  • Length: 160'
  • Beam: 23'3"
  • Draft:5'4" forward, 5'11" aft (full load)
  • Speed: 15.5 knots
  • Armament: 4 20mm
  • Complement 3 officers, 21 enlisted
  • Capacity: 6 officers and 182 troops or 75 tons cargo
  • 2 sets G.M. diesel engins twin variable-pitch screws, 1600 BHP

LCI(L)-351 Class

  • Displacement: 385 tons (full load)
  • Length: 160'4"
  • Beam: 23'3"
  • Draft: 5'8" forward, and aft (full load)
  • Speed: 15.5 knots
  • Armament: 5 20mm
  • Complement: 4 officers, 25 enlisted
  • Capacity: 9 officers, 200 enlisted or 75 tons cargo
  • 2 sets G.M. diesel engins twin variable-pitch screws, 1600 BHP

LCI(M) -- Landing Craft, Infantry (Mortar)

  • Displacement: 385 tons (full load)
  • Length: 160'4"
  • Beam: 23'3"
  • Draft: 5'4" forward, 5'11" aft (full load)
  • Speed: 15.5 knots
  • Armament: 1 40m, 3 4.2 chemical mortars, 4 20mm
  • Complement: 4 officers, 49 enlisted
  • 8 GM diesels, twin screws
  • Converted from LCI(L) and LCI(G)

LCI(R) -- Landing Craft, Infantry (Rocket)

  • Displacement: 385 tons (full load)
  • Length: 160'4"
  • Beam: 23'3"
  • Draft: 5'4" forward, 5'11" aft (full load)
  • Speed: 15.5 knots
  • Complement: 3 officers, 31 enlisted
  • Armament: 1 40mm, 4 20mm, 6 5" rocket launchers
  • 8 GM diesels, twin screws
  • Converted while building from LCI(L)s and LCI(G)s

LCS(L) -- Landing Craft, Support (Large)

Click on "LCS(L)-##" for link to page with specifications, history, photographs (where available).

  • Displacement: 383 tons (full load)
  • Length: 158'5"
  • Beam: 23'3"
  • Draft: 4'6" forward, 5'10" aft
  • Speed:
  • Armament: 1 3"/50 DP, 2x2 40mm, 4 20mm
  • Complement: 5 officers, 68 enlisted
  • 2 G.M. diesel engines, model 6051, 1800 hp.
  • Converted from LCI(L) hulls, but entirely rearranged internally
  • Provides fire support for landing operations intercepts and destroys inter-island barge traffic

Additional Resources

    LCSL National Association (1-130)
      Mr. Jeff Jeffers
      PO Box 9087
      Waukegan, IL 60079-9087
      847-623-7450 (O)
      847-360-0560 (H)
      Central Point, OR: Hellgate Press, 2000
      ISBN 1-55571-522-2
      Turner Publishing Company
      ISBN: 1-56311-251-5

    LCT -- Landing Craft, Tank

    Additional Links

    Mark 5 Type

    Additional Links

    • Displacement: 286 tons (landing)
    • Length: 117'6"
    • Beam: 32'
    • Draft: 2'10" forward, 4'2" aft (landing)
    • Speed: 8 knots
    • Armament: 2 20mm
    • Complement: 1 officer, 12 enlisted
    • Capacity: 5 30-ton or 4 40-ton or 3 50-ton tanks or 9 trucks or 150 tons cargo
    • 3 Gray 225 hp diesels, triple screws

    Mark VI Type

    • Displacement: 309 tons (landing)
    • Length: 119'
    • Beam: 32'
    • Draft: 3'7" forward, 4' aft (landing)
    • Speed: 8 knots
    • Armament: 2 20mm
    • Complement: 1 officer, 12 enlisted
    • Capacity: 4 medium or 3 50-ton tanks or 150 tons cargo accomodations for 8 troops
    • 3 Gray 225 hp diesels triple screws

    Return to HyperWar: World War II on the World Wide Web Last updated: 23 September 2010


    Goldcrest II LCI - History

    Navy and Coast Guard Veterans of World War II and Korea

    Navy and Coast Guard Veterans of World War II and Korea

    USS Landing Craft Infantry National Association

    Elsie Item 104
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    Elsie Item 104
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    Elsie Item 105
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    The LCI(L)-85 is featured in National Geographic's Drain the Ocean: Secrets of D-Day airing Monday, June 3 at 9PM. You can read more about the LCI(L)-85 in this article from our ELSIE Item Archives

    Saluting Our Coast Guard Shipmates – Flotilla Ten at Normandy

    Elsie Item 104
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    Elsie Item 104
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    Elsie Item 104
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    By Vaughn Brown, Ken Campbell, Pat Campbell

    Vaughn Brown’s LCI(R) 1077 Career

    By Ken Stern and Earle L. Bailey QM1/c

    Memories of the LCI 41

    By Vernon Wallace as told to Tom Gorham

    Elsie Item 103
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    Elsie Item 103
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    Elsie Item 103
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    Guns Behind Palagi Rock

    Fond Memories of LCI 35 and a Dance Floor in Brighton, England

    A Lucky Japanese Dive-Bomber Spoils the Day for the LCI(G) 23 Gunboat

    "Now it Can be Told" LCI (R) 765 Takes on a Japanese Destroyer

    Navy Beachmasters on "Red & Green" Omaha

    Welcome

    The LCI National Association is dedicated to preserving the history of the World War II Landing Craft Infantry ships and honoring the sailors that manned them. On this site you will find first-hand accounts from the sailors, stories about the battles they fought and the experiences they had, and photos of the men and their ships.


    Going For Broke Part Two: The 442nd Regimental Combat Team

    The 442nd Regimental Combat Team, a segregated Japanese American unit, is remembered today for its brave actions in World War II. Despite the odds, the 442nd’s actions distinguished them as the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in the history of the US military.

    Soon after the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, effectively placing over 100,000 West Coast residents of Japanese descent, the majority of them American citizens, into incarceration camps. Racism against Japanese Americans was rampant as much of the country grew more fearful and suspicious of collaboration with the Japanese government. But Japanese Americans were equally outraged at the attack on their country. Despite the growing racism against them, many Japanese Americans answered the call to war.

    President Roosevelt activated the 442nd Regimental Combat Team on February 1, 1943, nearly one year after the signing of EO9066. Hawaiian-born Nisei (second-generation Japanese Americans) made up roughly two-thirds of the regiment, with the remaining third composed of Nisei from the mainland United States. The motto of the unit was “Go For Broke,” a phrase that meant putting everything on the line in an effort to win big. Just as other minority groups, Japanese Americans faced two wars during World War II—war against the Axis powers and war against racism back home—making “Go For Broke” an appropriate motto.

    The 442nd RCT consisted of multiple units, including the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion, 232nd Combat Engineer Company, 206th Army Ground Forces Band, an Antitank Company, Cannon Company, Service Company, a medical detachment, and three infantry battalions. From May 1943 to April 1944, the men of the 442nd trained for combat, where they learned to fight as a team and excelled in practice maneuvers. Over the course of training, many men would be sent to Europe as replacements for the 100th Infantry Battalion, another Japanese American unit already fighting overseas and creating its own impressive track record.

    A squad leader of the 442nd watching for German movement on the front lines in France. Courtesy of the US National Archives.

    Members of the 442nd pose for a photo while riding a jeep in France. Courtesy US National Archives.

    Training for the 442nd was completed in April, and on April 22, 1944, the unit left Camp Shelby in Mississippi on their journey to Europe for their first overseas assignment. They arrived in Italy in June 1944, where they began to fight alongside the 100th against Germans encamped across the country. By August, the 100th was absorbed into the 442nd, with all units serving under the motto “Go For Broke.” In September 1944, the 442nd participated in the invasion of Southern France, successfully liberating French cities from Nazi occupation. The unit went on to fight with the 92nd Infantry Division, a segregated African American unit, in driving German forces out of northern Italy.

    Today, the 442nd is remembered as the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in the history of the US military. The unit, totaling about 18,000 men, over 4,000 Purple Hearts, 4,000 Bronze Stars, 560 Silver Star Medals, 21 Medals of Honor, and seven Presidential Unit Citations. Additionally, the 100th garnished their own impressive record prior to their absorption into the 442nd. In 2010, various groups and advocates, including the National Veterans Network, were successful in obtaining congressional passage of the bill S. 1055, awarding all members of the 100th and 442nd, along with the Military Intelligence Service, the Congressional Gold Medal for their heroic service in World War II.

    Against the odds, the men of the 100th Infantry Battalion and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team did “go for broke.” Despite the years of suspicion and racism that prevailed at home, these Nisei men fought for their country and their ideals of freedom and democracy. They fought heroically, leaving behind a record that is still untouched today.

    Going for Broke Part One: The 100th Infantry Battalion

    The 100th Infantry Battalion, comprised largely of second generation Nisei, bravely fought in Europe and became one of America's most highly decorated units of World War II.


    Goldcrest II LCI - History

    From Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships , Vol. III (1977), pp. 115

    A small European bird of the genus Regulus .

    (LCI(L)-869: dp. 209 l. 159' b. 24' dr. 5'8" s. 14 k. cpl. 21 a. 5 20mm. cl. LCI (L)-351 )

    LCI(L)-869 was laid down by the New Jersey S. B. Corp., Barber, N.J., 31 August 1944 launched 29 September 1944 and commissioned 7 October 1944, Lt. (j.g.) J. C. Smith in command.

    With shakedown in Chesapeake Bay, the new large infantry landing craft departed Key West, Fla., 12 November for the Pacific, transited the Panama Canal on the 19th, and arrived San Diego 1 December. There she joined LCI Group 57, sailed for Hawaii 29 January 1945, and arrived Pearl Harbor 7 February.

    LCI(L)-869 got underway for the war zone on the 15th, refueled at Johnston Island 5 days later, and reached the Palaus, via Majuro, Kwajalein, Eniwetok, and Guam, 7 April. There she joined a picket line which had been formed to seal off by-passed Japanese-held islands in the area from reinforcements and to protect American bases from invasion. While on picket station, LCI(L)-869 repulsed a suicide swimming attack, sank several floating mines which threatened American ships, and heard countless mortar shells whine overhead.

    On the afternoon of 2 September, the Japanese forces in the Palaus surrendered. With her mission accomplished, LCI(L)-869 returned to the United States, decommissioned at Norfolk in March 1947, and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

    The landing craft was named Goldcrest and redesignated AMc(U)-24 on 7 March 1952. Goldcrest was converted at the Charleston Navy Yard, assigned to the 6th Naval District, and operated out of Key West, Fla. She decommissioned at Charleston in March 1955 and reentered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Charleston. There she was reclassified a coastal minehunter and redesignated MHC-24. Goldcrest was struck from the Navy List 1 January 1960 and scrapped.

    [NOTE: The first Goldcrest was AM-80, a converted merchant trawler that saw World War II duty as a patrol craft and school ship off the East coast. She was decommissoned in 1945.]


    Originally signet rings were emblazoned with a family crest and they would frequently be used to stamp, or sign a document. The metal shapes would leave a permanent mark in any soft wax or even clay and this would be placed onto a variety of legal documents. Some of the most important documents in history have been stamped with a signet ring. In its day the stamp of a ring was seen as more authentic than a signature.

    Before the days of the internet and other electronic wizardry it was normal for all the most influential people in the world to have these rings and use them to confirm the authenticity of any document. These rings usually look magnificent but they were designed with a very practical purpose in mind.

    Every ring was unique, the markings usually included the family crest but there would always be a significant mark which personally identified the ring holder. Some of the rings were simple monograms or icons which were associated with the most important families. All rings were reverse engineered to ensure that the design came out properly when they were stamped on a document. Of course, this level of detail also ensured the rings were expensive and very difficult to copy.

    The signet ring was used as long ago as 3500 BC. Records show the people of Mesopotamia used cylindrical seals as marks of authenticity. This is really the origin of the corporate seal which is still used by some companies today.

    By the time of the ancient Egyptians the seal had become attached to a ring and Pharaohs and other important people of the day would wear them to show their position.

    At the beginning of the Minoan period most rings were formed from soft stones or ivory but by the end of this period they were created from harder stones. The bronze age saw a shift to metal rings and they took on their current day appearance. There was even a period when they were considered an art form and many people had collections of them.

    By the Middle Ages, any person of influence had a signet ring. This included all the nobility and they were used to sign all letters and legal documents. In fact, in the fourteenth century King Edward II decreed that all official documents must be signed with the King’s signet ring. The majority of rings dating from these periods were destroyed when their owner died. This is because they were unique and it avoided any possibility of forged documents appearing after a nobleman’s death. Having a ring during this period marked you as a member of the highest class and above other, common men.

    The nineteenth century saw many rings become more ornate as precious and semi-precious jewels were added to these rings. The best of these rings had the stone set on a rotating bezel which allowed it to be worn facing out or facing into your finger. They were always made of silver or gold.

    Members of the Freemasons still opt to wear a ring which identifies them and their affiliation. These rings are not the same as the original signet rings but do serve a similar purpose. It has become traditionally for many organisations to wear rings class rings or biker gangs are two prominent examples. In wealthy families, the head of the family wears an imposing signet, which he will pass on to his son the tradition will pass from generation to generation.

    There are still a few people who commission their own signet rings although these are never be used legally mark a document anymore. There are many more people who wear a signet ring that has been passed down from generation to generation and this will continue for the foreseeable future. These rings are authentic signet rings but the markings are not unique to the current ring bearer.


    World War II Database


    ww2dbase Early in the European War, the British drew up a requirement for a design tentatively named as "Giant Raiding Craft", or "GRC". It was envisioned that large craft around the size o 150-feet in length would be able to deliver 200 soldiers directly to beaches up to 230 miles away from the United Kingdom to conduct occasional raids, which would attempt to tie down a significant German presence in occupied France to defend against such raids. As the development was underway, the British approached the United States Navy for potential construction contracts, but the US Navy was not interested. The United States Army, with its own need for landing craft, accepted the joint venture. The final design came out to be a craft with length of 160 feet, beam of 23 feet, forward draft of 2 feet 6 inches and stern draft of 4 feet 5 inches. The craft was designed to carry a crew of 24 (3 officers and 21 enlisted) and either 188 passengers (6 officers and 182 enlisted) or 75 tons of cargo. In addition to the cargo or passenger space, holds belowdecks were also capable of holding 120 tons of fuel, 240 gallons of lubricating oil, and 36 tons of fresh water each landing craft. The craft's design was kept very simple in order to speed up construction, thus the shape of the craft boxy. Initially, they were envisioned to be completely unarmed, but it was soon realized that it was unrealistic to assume that these transports did not need to be armed, as they would come under fire as they disembarked troops on hostile beaches. They were thus provided with light anti-aircraft armament consisted of four or five Oerlikon 20-millimeter Mk 4 automatic cannons. Some of them had a Bofors 40-millimeter cannon on the bow for greater firepower. The British planned to substitute in two 0.303-inch Lewis Mk I machine guns for air defense.

    ww2dbase The first contract was officially signed with George Lawley & Sons Shipbuilding Corporation (Neponset, Massachusetts, United States) and New York Shipbuilding Corporation (Camden, New Jersey, United States) on 3 Jun 1942, and production began in the following month, and shortly after the design was designated "Landing Craft, Infantry (Large)", or LCI(L) or even simply LCI for short. The first prototypes were launched, LCI-1 and LCI-209, and were tested in Sep and Oct 1942. In late 1942, a group of eight LCIs made their first journey into the Atlantic Ocean from Norfolk, Virginia, United States to Bermuda Islands they weathered Force 4 winds, proving themselves seaworthy, though they also rolled badly. 299 of the LCI-1 sub-class landing craft were built 45 in-progress LCI-1 sub-class craft were canceled in order to speed along the improved LCI-351 sub-class. 211 of them were transferred to the British Royal Navy under the Lend-Lease program.

    ww2dbase The LCI-351 sub-class landing craft had better accommodations and larger work areas for troops and crews, the hatches were enlarged to accept litters, and the bridge structures were rounder (bridge structures of the LCI-1 sub-class were rectangular). Their holds belowdecks held roughly the same amount of fuel and water as their predecessors (10 tons less fuel but 1 ton more water). The first LCI-351 sub-class landing craft was laid down on 5 Mar 1943, launched on 8 Apr, and commissioned on 14 May.

    ww2dbase Because LCI landing craft were designed to be versatile craft capable of sailing in shallow waters, and were already built to be able to withstand some enemy fire, some of them were converted so that they could serve as fire support craft. These converted landing craft carried a wide array of armaments such as 3-inch guns, 5-inch guns, 4.2-inch mortars, 4.5-inch barrage rockets, and 5-inch barrage rockets. Some of the other variants include command craft, ammunition transports, and home vessels for underwater demolition teams.

    ww2dbase The first combat mission that employed LCI landing craft was the Operation Torch invasion of North Africa in Nov 1942, where the British Royal Navy LCI craft sailed directly from the United Kingdom, while the American ones island hopped across the Atlantic Ocean. The first use of LCI landing craft in the Pacific War was during the Jun 1943 landings in New Georgia, Solomon Islands, where they delivered second and fourth echelons of troops to the islands. They were valued for their ability to travel in shallow areas of water at the atolls where the larger LST transports could not, and they were able to economically deliver small forces to remote island areas. They were also used during the invasion of Sicily, Italy in Jul 1943, where they landed troops during the pre-dawn hours while facing hostile fire. Back in the Pacific Ocean, in Jan 1944, the invasion of Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands were supported by 12 LCI(FS) craft, which were LCI craft fitted out with rocket launchers. While the rockets did not necessarily cause significant damage, nor the guns and cannons that opened up after the rockets, but they were valued for their demoralizing effects on the Japanese as well as to rally the spirit of the invasion troops about to disembark onto hostile beaches.

    ww2dbase Thus far, landing craft of both sub-classes featured ramps on either side of the bow for troops to disembark. A third sub-class, LCI-402, featured centerline bow ramps similar to those of the LST landing ships. After 1 Jun 1944, all LCI landing craft being constructed were equipped with bow doors.

    ww2dbase During the Okinawa campaign, 42 LCI(M) craft (equipped with mortars) supported the initial landings, firing 28,000 rounds on a strip 5.5 miles wide and 300 yards deep during the first hour of landings. As the fighting moved inland, they tend to circle around radar-equipped larger ships such as destroyers, and when called upon, the radar-equipped ships would relay the direction and distance of targets to the LCI(M) craft, which then would loose barrages of mortar shells at the suspected Japanese positions.

    ww2dbase In early 1945, 25 LCI landing craft were transferred to Russia. The Russian crews that later manned these landing craft were trained by United States Coast Guard personnel at Cold Bay, Alaska, United States.

    ww2dbase After the war, most LCI landing craft were inactivated by the Royal Navy and the US Navy within the first two years, though a few were used during the Korean War and a very small number of fire support craft were used during the Vietnam War. Most of them were scrapped, sold to foreign navies, or sold into the civilian market.


    Play the Original And New Editions of Jewel Quest

    The seventh chapter in the award-winning Jewel Quest series is here!

    The famous jewel adventurers, Rupert and Emma are back and on an adventure unlike any you have ever seen before!

    After receiving an urgent mysterious message from their old friend Hani: "Jewel Boards in danger.", the duo must work together to save the Jewel Boards and get Hani to safety. But can they do both? Will they have to choose between the treasured Jewel Boards and their friend? And who is putting everyone in danger? Find out in Jewel Quest: 7 Seas!

    Dive into this exciting adventure by matching 3+ jewels as fast as you can. Jewel Quest: Seven Seas stays true to its roots - giving longtime Jewel Quest fans a &ldquopure&rdquo jewel matching experience while delighting new players with jewel swapping tricks unique to this beloved series of games. Exciting new elements include new jewels to match, new tools and power-ups as well as a never-before seen Collapse-style mode!

    With over 200 gameplay levels, this game give you days of jewel-matching fun!

    Other cool features:
    - Hundreds of levels of gem-matching fun
    - New Tools! Match 4 jewels to create a Ship Wheel, then flick it anywhere you want it to go to eliminate even more jewels!
    - Existing Tools got that much better! Use the Midas Touch tool to turn any tile gold!
    - Expert Levels await you! Complete all regular levels to unlock!
    - 14 stunning environments, each with its unique gameplay style.

    The History of Jewel Quest

    The History of Jewel Quest

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    Find out more about the series origins on Wikipedia

    2016: Jewel Quest (Wii U)

    Jewel Quest for Wii U™ brings the classic Match-3 puzzle game to life in stunning HD! Solve 72 challenging puzzles through 6 fantastic, beautifully-rendered locations, each with its own unique, orchestral background music.

    Make matches of three (or more) of a kind to remove jewels from the board and turn the tiles behind them to gold, but don't run out of time or moves before completing the board!

    Raise your level of play to achieve three stars on every level and see how you rank against your friends in the ultimate Match-3 challenge!

    2013: Jewel Quest iOS

    The original match 3 game is back - and better than ever. Are you a match 3 fan? Have you experienced the game that started the phenomenon?

    Can you spot the match before it happens? Test your mental prowess in this fun and frantic match 3 adventure.

    Endless challenges await in this brain-bending puzzler as you explore the mysterious Isles of Illusion. Uncover their secrets. and survive their dangers!

    2012: Jewel Quest Mysteries: The Oracle of Ur (PC)

    As an ancient folk tale goes, when the gods returned to the sky, they left behind nine mysterious jewel boards through which they could speak to us, lest we stray too far. Wars destroyed all but one jewel board - the Oracle of Ur.

    All facts about this legendary object are lost in time until Rupert discovers a clue to the 4,000-year-old story and starts his quest for the most coveted jewel board of all. He enlists the help of his two best friends, Emma and Sebastian, in this exciting expedition. Can they succeed in retrieving the Oracle of Ur?

    2012: Jewel Quest: The Sapphire Dragon (PC)

    While piloting his Cessna in a Himalayan snowstorm, Raj crash-lands on a frozen mountain, thus kicking off the adventure in Jewel Quest 6: The Sapphire Dragon.
    Raj’s crash has led him to a chance discovery of the Temple of Wishes, an ancient complex thought to be only legend!

    Raj’s hotshot team of archaeologists is led on a quest around the globe in pursuit of Jiang Hao and her pirate posse. On their journey, the group must use their skills to uncover secrets about the Sapphire Dragon.

    2011: Jewel Quest Mysteries: The Seventh Gate (PC)

    The hit hidden object series is back, and it's better than ever! Venture through the hidden relics of Greece as you join Emma in search of her husband and daughter, who have fallen victim to a horrible struggle.

    They began their journey to uncover the mysteries of the famed jewel boards of ancient Greece. Emma must find her missing family before the impending volcanic eruption that will put all of their lives in peril.

    Don't miss out on this exciting and dangerous adventure that is unlike any other!

    2010: Jewel Quest: The Sleepless Star (PC)

    Follow the travails of intrepid explorer, Percy Pack, in Jewel Quest: The Sleepless Star.

    On a quest for a jewel called the Sleepless Star, Pack discovers that the jewel has been stolen from a Native American village by an unscrupulous jewel collector!

    Solve over 200 jewel board puzzles, including never-before-seen obstacle puzzles! Progress through a beautifully illustrated and fully voice-acted story that includes collectible power-ups and quest options filled with your favorite classic Jewel Quest games.

    2009: Jewel Quest Heritage (PC)

    It began like any other day. Rupert Pack breezed through a morning's work at his museum with no sign that anything was amiss. until government agents stormed through the museum's doors to confiscate its prized possession!

    Within minutes, the Golden Jewel Board has been seized and Rupert is dealt another shock: the Board is en route to none other than the evil Sebastian Grenard, who has claimed it as a family heirloom! Now Rupert must investigate long-buried family secrets in order to discover the truth.

    Hit the trail with Rupert on a journey through the shrines and castles of Hernan Cortes' lore. Swap jewels and collect puzzle pieces to unravel a perplexing web of family history. With over 170 new Jewel Boards, including 3 jewel-swapping modes, new surprises await in every level.

    2009: Jewel Quest Mysteries: Trail of the Midnight Heart (PC)

    After answering her uncle's call, Eva Witheby winds up far from home and amidst strangers in Jewel Quest Mysteries Trail of the Midnight Heart. It's hard to know who to trust when treacherous trails and veiled secrets abound. Alongside Eva, uncover relics in eye catching hidden object screens.

    Unearth tools that will help you reveal shards of the precious jewel boards and discover all new scrolling search screens that put you in the front seat of whizzing planes and a whirlwind adventure.

    Jewel Quest Mysteries 2 is a hidden object adventure like no other!

    2009: Jewel Quest Solitaire III (PC)

    Rupert and Emma's friend, Ratu, has discovered a valuable tablet in the ruins of an ancient civilization, little does he know that this find is just the beginning.

    When his beloved assistant Yumi is abducted, Ratu is propelled into a treacherous game of cat-and-mouse with a gang of dangerous thugs.

    Travel with Ratu in this Jewel Quest Solitaire sequel, and experience compelling Solitaire layouts and addictive new Jewel Quest boards. Fresh features and power-ups, plus 100 boards of combined play, will make Jewel Quest Solitaire III feel brand new again!

    2008: Jewel Quest Mysteries: Curse of the Emerald Tear (PC)

    In Jewel Quest Mysteries, Rupert and Emma are plunged into the land of ancient intrigue, Egypt.

    Seek out treasures and jewels, hidden within stunning gardens and relic-laden palaces. Swap jewels to turn tiles gold in classic Jewel Quest boards, and decipher puzzles of logic and wit.

    A hidden object game shrouded in the lore of Jewel Quest and the mystique of ancient Egypt.

    2008 Jewel Quest III (PC)

    Rupert and Emma have settled down and opened a museum to display their many artifacts. While playing with a mysterious jewel board, their daughter unknowingly pops open a secret compartment. Suddenly, the air is filled with spores, and Natalie's vision fades.

    Desperate to save their daughter's sight, Rupert and Emma search the globe in search of the fabled Golden Jewel Board, rumored to hold the antidote that will cure her, but does it even exist?

    Guided by cryptic clues left by a shady stranger, Rupert and Emma encounter new challenges wild monkeys to capture, powerful pearls that can alter the jewel boards, and head-to-head competition that pit you against renowned experts, Hani and Sebastian.

    Time is running out! It's up to you to follow the clues and find the cure!

    2007 Jewel Quest Solitaire II (PC)

    Emma and Rupert return to Africa where they are met by Aunt Roberta, a loony lady with a crazy cache of lore and a hatbox full of playing cards.

    She will lead our unlikely duo from marketplaces to museums in a brand new card-matching, jewel-swapping, mystery-solving adventure! New jewels, coins, and special moves on the jewel board await you in 114 all new layouts set against rich, vibrant backgrounds.

    Play your cards wisely, or your journey could soon end. Intrigue waits around every corner!

    2007: Jewel Quest II (PC)

    Join Professor Pack on the ultimate jewel matching adventure across the world's richest continent.

    The dangers of the safari, The history of the Zimbabwe ruins and the majesty of Victoria Falls await your discovery, filled with puzzles of skill and twists, while surrounded by gorgeous dynamic backdrops and animation.

    Get swept away by the heart pounding soundtrack as you're immersed in realistic and authentic African settings.

    2006: Jewel Quest Solitaire (PC)

    The creative minds behind Jewel Quest return with a Solitaire card game filled with riches and adventure.

    Play Tri-peaks Solitaire in a new way using jewel-themed card decks. Match card suits to earn pieces for the jewel board then turn the board's spaces to gold. Unearth buried cards, avoid cursed jewels, and solve the 114 card layouts on a South American jungle trek.

    Experience 684 possible card scenarios through an exciting new Jewel Quest story.

    2004: Jewel Quest (PC)

    Explore the ancient ruins of Mayan civilization while discovering hidden treasures and priceless artifacts.

    In this unique new take on the classic-style matching game, you must rearrange valuable relics to turn sand tiles into gold.
    When all of the tiles in a puzzle board are golden, you win! As you venture deeper into the jungle, you will encounter increasingly difficult puzzles containing secret twists, cursed items, and buried artifacts.

    Earn the respect of your fellow archaeologists and collect oodles of treasure and jewels!


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